Epidemiology and Global Health

Epidemiology and Global Health

eLife publishes research on the entire spectrum of diseases and health conditions of global public health importance. Learn more about what we publish and sign up for the latest research.
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Latest articles

    1. Ecology
    2. Epidemiology and Global Health

    Physiology and ecology combine to determine host and vector importance for Ross River virus

    Morgan P Kain et al.
    The role host and vector species play in pathogen transmission cycles is best quantified by integrating species' physiological and ecological competence.
    1. Epidemiology and Global Health
    2. Genetics and Genomics

    A proteome-wide genetic investigation identifies several SARS-CoV-2-exploited host targets of clinical relevance

    Mohd Anisul et al.
    Genetic integration of human protein abundance variation and COVID-19 susceptibility identifies proteins with potential causal roles in antiviral responses, coagulation, cytokine activation, and direct receptor interactions with SARS-CoV-2.
    1. Epidemiology and Global Health

    Infection-exposure in infancy is associated with reduced allergy-related disease in later childhood in a Ugandan cohort

    Lawrence Lubyayi et al.
    In a Ugandan birth cohort, early childhood infection-exposure, notably to malaria, helminths, and diarrhoea, is associated with lower prevalence of atopy and allergy-related diseases in later childhood.
    1. Computational and Systems Biology
    2. Epidemiology and Global Health

    Characterizing human mobility patterns in rural settings of sub-Saharan Africa

    Hannah R Meredith et al.
    Mobile phone data reveal aspects of human mobility patterns in Sub-Saharan Africa missed by standard spatial models however, model estimates can be improved by accounting for trip urbanicity and region.
    1. Epidemiology and Global Health
    2. Immunology and Inflammation

    Inflammation: Western diet shifts immune cell balance

    Christina M Bergey
    The immune cells of macaques fed a Western-like diet adopt a pro-inflammatory profile.
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    1. Epidemiology and Global Health
    2. Immunology and Inflammation

    Contrasting effects of Western vs Mediterranean diets on monocyte inflammatory gene expression and social behavior in a primate model

    Corbin SC Johnson et al.
    Modern human diet patterns alter primate behavior and monocyte gene expression leading to monocyte polarization–experimental evidence of the evolutionary mismatch hypothesis.

Senior editors

  1. Balram Bhargava
    Indian Council of Medical Research, India
  2. Eduardo Franco
    McGill University, Canada
  3. David Serwadda
    Makerere University School of Public Health, Uganda
  4. See more editors