The dimeric Golgi protein Gorab binds to Sas6 as a monomer to mediate centriole duplication

  1. Agnieszka Fatalska  Is a corresponding author
  2. Emma Stepinac
  3. Magdalena Richter
  4. Levente Kovacs
  5. Zbigniew Pietras
  6. Martin Puchinger
  7. Gang Dong
  8. Michal Dadlez
  9. David M Glover  Is a corresponding author
  1. University of Cambridge, United Kingdom
  2. Medical University of Vienna, Austria
  3. Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics PAS, Poland
  4. University of Vienna, Austria

Abstract

The duplication and 9-fold symmetry of the Drosophila centriole requires that the cartwheel molecule, Sas6, physically associates with Gorab, a trans-Golgi component. How Gorab achieves these disparate associations is unclear. Here we use hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to define Gorab's interacting surfaces that mediate its sub-cellular localization. We identify a core stabilization sequence within Gorab's C-terminal coiled-coil domain that enables homodimerization, binding to Rab6, and thereby trans-Golgi localization. By contrast, part of the Gorab monomer's coiled-coil domain undergoes an anti-parallel interaction with a segment of the parallel coiled-coil dimer of Sas6. This stable hetero-trimeric complex can be visualized by electron microscopy. Mutation of a single leucine residue in Sas6's Gorab-binding domain generates a Sas6 variant with a 16-fold reduced binding affinity for Gorab that can not support centriole duplication. Thus Gorab dimers at the Golgi exist in equilibrium with Sas-6 associated monomers at the centriole to balance Gorab's dual role.

Data availability

All data generated or analysed during this study are included in the manuscript and supporting files.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Agnieszka Fatalska

    Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    For correspondence
    af589@cam.ac.uk
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-1720-4742
  2. Emma Stepinac

    Department of Medical Biochemistry, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Magdalena Richter

    Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Levente Kovacs

    Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Zbigniew Pietras

    Laboratory of RNA Biology and Functional Genomics, Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics PAS, Warsaw, Poland
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Martin Puchinger

    Department of Structural and Computational Biology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Gang Dong

    Department of Medical Biochemistry, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  8. Michal Dadlez

    Biophysics, Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics PAS, Warsaw, Poland
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  9. David M Glover

    Genetics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    For correspondence
    dmg25@cam.ac.uk
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Funding

Wellcome Trust (Investigator Award)

  • David M Glover

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (R01NS113930)

  • David M Glover

National Science Centre (MAESTRO project UMO-2014/14/A/NZ1/00306)

  • Agnieszka Fatalska
  • Michal Dadlez

Austrian Science Fund (P28231-B28)

  • Gang Dong

Austrian Science Fund (W-1258 Doktoratskollegs)

  • Emma Stepinac

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Anna Akhmanova, Utrecht University, Netherlands

Publication history

  1. Received: March 26, 2020
  2. Accepted: March 11, 2021
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: March 11, 2021 (version 1)
  4. Accepted Manuscript updated: March 12, 2021 (version 2)
  5. Accepted Manuscript updated: March 12, 2021 (version 3)
  6. Version of Record published: March 30, 2021 (version 4)

Copyright

© 2021, Fatalska et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Agnieszka Fatalska
  2. Emma Stepinac
  3. Magdalena Richter
  4. Levente Kovacs
  5. Zbigniew Pietras
  6. Martin Puchinger
  7. Gang Dong
  8. Michal Dadlez
  9. David M Glover
(2021)
The dimeric Golgi protein Gorab binds to Sas6 as a monomer to mediate centriole duplication
eLife 10:e57241.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.57241

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