Isolation and transcriptomic analysis of Anopheles gambiae oenocytes enables the delineation of hydrocarbon biosynthesis

  1. Linda Grigoraki  Is a corresponding author
  2. Xavier Grau-Bové
  3. Henrietta Carrington Yates
  4. Gareth J Lycett
  5. Hilary Ranson  Is a corresponding author
  1. Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom

Abstract

The surface of insects is coated in cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs); variations in the composition of this layer affect a range of traits including adaptation to arid environments and defence against pathogens and toxins. In the African malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae quantitative and qualitative variance in CHC composition have been associated with speciation, ecological habitat and insecticide resistance. Understanding how these modifications arise will inform us of how mosquitoes are responding to climate change and vector control interventions. CHCs are synthesised in sub-epidermal cells called oenocytes that are very difficult to isolate from surrounding tissues. Here we utilise a transgenic line with fluorescent oenocytes to purify these cells for the first time. Comparative transcriptomics revealed the enrichment of biological processes related to long chain fatty acyl-CoA biosynthesis and elongation of mono-, poly-unsaturated and saturated fatty acids and enabled us to delineate, and partially validate, the hydrocarbon biosynthetic pathway in An. gambiae.

Data availability

Transcriptome sequencing has been deposited in the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA), under PRJEB37240 project.All data generated or analysed during this study are included in the manuscript and supporting files. Source data files have been provided for Figures 1,2,3 and 5.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Linda Grigoraki

    Vector Biology, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, United Kingdom
    For correspondence
    Linta.Grigoraki@lstmed.ac.uk
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-8997-0406
  2. Xavier Grau-Bové

    Vector Biology, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-1978-5824
  3. Henrietta Carrington Yates

    Vector Biology, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-6199-7009
  4. Gareth J Lycett

    Vector Biology, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Hilary Ranson

    Vector Biology, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, United Kingdom
    For correspondence
    hilary.ranson@lstmed.ac.uk
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Funding

Wellcome (Sir Henry Wellcome Postdoctoral Fellowship,215894/Z/19/Z)

  • Linda Grigoraki

Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (Director's Catalyst Fund)

  • Linda Grigoraki

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Malcolm J McConville, The University of Melbourne, Australia

Publication history

  1. Received: April 17, 2020
  2. Accepted: June 12, 2020
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: June 15, 2020 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: July 10, 2020 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2020, Grigoraki et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Linda Grigoraki
  2. Xavier Grau-Bové
  3. Henrietta Carrington Yates
  4. Gareth J Lycett
  5. Hilary Ranson
(2020)
Isolation and transcriptomic analysis of Anopheles gambiae oenocytes enables the delineation of hydrocarbon biosynthesis
eLife 9:e58019.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.58019

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