1. Cell Biology
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Glucose restriction drives spatial reorganization of mevalonate metabolism

  1. Sean M Rogers
  2. Hanaa Hariri
  3. N Ezgi M Wood
  4. Natalie Ortiz Speer
  5. W Mike Henne  Is a corresponding author
  1. University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, United States
Research Article
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Cite this article as: eLife 2021;10:e62591 doi: 10.7554/eLife.62591

Abstract

Eukaryotes compartmentalize metabolic pathways into sub-cellular domains, but the role of inter-organelle contacts in organizing metabolic reactions remains poorly understood. Here, we show that in response to acute glucose restriction (AGR) yeast undergo metabolic remodeling of their mevalonate pathway that is spatially coordinated at nucleus-vacuole junctions (NVJs). The NVJ serves as a metabolic platform by selectively retaining HMG-CoA Reductases (HMGCRs), driving mevalonate pathway flux in an Upc2-dependent manner. Both spatial retention of HMGCRs and increased mevalonate pathway flux during AGR is dependent on NVJ tether Nvj1. Furthermore, we demonstrate that HMGCRs associate into high molecular weight assemblies during AGR in an Nvj1-dependent manner. Loss of Nvj1-mediated HMGCR partitioning can be bypassed by artificially multimerizing HMGCRs, indicating NVJ compartmentalization enhances mevalonate pathway flux by promoting the association of HMGCRs in high molecular weight assemblies. Loss of HMGCR compartmentalization perturbs yeast growth following glucose starvation, indicating it promotes adaptive metabolic remodeling. Collectively we propose a non-canonical mechanism regulating mevalonate metabolism via the spatial compartmentalization of rate-limiting HMGCR enzymes at an inter-organelle contact site.

Data availability

All data in the BioRvix paper:https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.08.29.273318v1.full

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Sean M Rogers

    Cell Biology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-1173-6526
  2. Hanaa Hariri

    Cell Biology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. N Ezgi M Wood

    Cell Biology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Natalie Ortiz Speer

    Cell Biology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-0982-3025
  5. W Mike Henne

    Department of Cell Biology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
    For correspondence
    mike.henne@utsouthwestern.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-2135-2799

Funding

Welch Foundation (I-1873)

  • W Mike Henne

National Institute of General Medical Sciences (GM119768)

  • W Mike Henne

National Institute of General Medical Sciences (5T32GM008297)

  • Sean M Rogers

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Benoît Kornmann, University of Oxford, United Kingdom

Publication history

  1. Received: August 29, 2020
  2. Accepted: April 6, 2021
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: April 7, 2021 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: April 20, 2021 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2021, Rogers et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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