1. Developmental Biology
  2. Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine
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Cystic proliferation of germline stem cells is necessary to reproductive success and normal mating behavior in medaka

  1. Luisa F Arias Padilla
  2. Diana C Castañeda-Cortés
  3. Ivana F Rosa
  4. Omar D Moreno Acosta
  5. Ricardo S Hattori
  6. Rafael H Nóbrega
  7. Juan I Fernandino  Is a corresponding author
  1. Instituto Tecnológico de Chascomús, INTECH (CONICET-UNSAM), Argentina
  2. Institute of Biosciences, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Brazil
  3. Salmonid Experimental Station at Campos do Jordão, Brazil
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Cite this article as: eLife 2021;10:e62757 doi: 10.7554/eLife.62757

Abstract

The production of an adequate number of gametes is necessary for normal reproduction, for which the regulation of proliferation from early gonadal development to adulthood is key in both sexes. Cystic proliferation of germline stem cells is an especially important step prior to the beginning of meiosis; however, the molecular regulators of this proliferation remain elusive in vertebrates. Here, we report that ndrg1b is an important regulator of cystic proliferation in medaka. We generated mutants of ndrg1b that led to a disruption of germ cells cystic proliferation. This loss of cystic proliferation was observed from embryogenic to adult stages, impacting the success of gamete production and reproductive parameters such as spawning and fertilization. Interestingly, the depletion of cystic proliferation also impacted male sexual behavior, with a decrease of mating vigor. These data illustrate why it is also necessary to consider gamete production capacity in order to analyze reproductive behavior.

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All data generated or analysed during this study are included in the manuscript and supporting files.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Luisa F Arias Padilla

    Laboratorio de Biologia del Desarrollo, Instituto Tecnológico de Chascomús, INTECH (CONICET-UNSAM), Chascomus, Argentina
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Diana C Castañeda-Cortés

    Laboratorio de Biologia del Desarrollo, Instituto Tecnológico de Chascomús, INTECH (CONICET-UNSAM), Chascomus, Argentina
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Ivana F Rosa

    Reproductive and Molecular Biology Group, Department of Structural and Functional Biology, Institute of Biosciences, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Botucatu, Brazil
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Omar D Moreno Acosta

    Laboratorio de Biologia del Desarrollo, Instituto Tecnológico de Chascomús, INTECH (CONICET-UNSAM), Chascomus, Argentina
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Ricardo S Hattori

    UPD-CJ, Salmonid Experimental Station at Campos do Jordão, Campos do Jordão, Brazil
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Rafael H Nóbrega

    Reproductive and Molecular Biology Group, Department of Structural and Functional Biology, Institute of Biosciences, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Botucatu, Brazil
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Juan I Fernandino

    Laboratorio de Biologia del Desarrollo, Instituto Tecnológico de Chascomús, INTECH (CONICET-UNSAM), Chascomus, Argentina
    For correspondence
    fernandino@intech.gov.ar
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-1754-2802

Funding

Agencia Nacional de Promoción Científica y Tecnológica (Grant 0366/12 and 2501/15)

  • Luisa F Arias Padilla

Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (14/07620-7 and 18/10265-5)

  • Rafael H Nóbrega

CONICET and São Paulo Research Foundation (International Cooperation Grant D 2979/16)

  • Ivana F Rosa

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Michel Bagnat, Duke University, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: September 3, 2020
  2. Accepted: February 28, 2021
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: March 1, 2021 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: March 10, 2021 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2021, Arias Padilla et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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