1. Neuroscience
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Local projections of layer Vb-to-Va are more prominent in lateral than in medial entorhinal cortex

  1. Shinya Ohara  Is a corresponding author
  2. Stefan Blankvoort
  3. Rajeevkumar Raveendran Nair
  4. Maximiliano J Nigro
  5. Eirik S Nilssen
  6. Cliff Kentros
  7. Menno P Witter  Is a corresponding author
  1. Tohoku University Graduate School of Life Sciences, Japan
  2. Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway
Research Article
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Cite this article as: eLife 2021;10:e67262 doi: 10.7554/eLife.67262

Abstract

The entorhinal cortex, in particular neurons in layer V, allegedly mediate transfer of information from the hippocampus to the neocortex, underlying long-term memory. Recently, this circuit has been shown to comprise a hippocampal output recipient layer Vb and a cortical projecting layer Va. With the use of in vitro electrophysiology in transgenic mice specific for layer Vb, we assessed the presence of the thus necessary connection from layer Vb-to-Va in the functionally distinct medial (MEC) and lateral (LEC) subdivisions; MEC, particularly its dorsal part, processes allocentric spatial information, whereas the corresponding part of LEC processes information representing elements of episodes. Using identical experimental approaches, we show that connections from layer Vb-to-Va neurons are stronger in dorsal LEC compared with dorsal MEC, suggesting different operating principles in these two regions. Although further in vivo experiments are needed, our findings imply a potential difference in how LEC and MEC mediate episodic systems-consolidation.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Shinya Ohara

    Laboratory of Systems Neuroscience, Tohoku University Graduate School of Life Sciences, Sendai, Japan
    For correspondence
    shinyaohara@gmail.com
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-0681-5086
  2. Stefan Blankvoort

    Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience and Centre for Neural Computation, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-3850-3829
  3. Rajeevkumar Raveendran Nair

    Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience and Centre for Neural Computation, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Maximiliano J Nigro

    Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience and Centre for Neural Computation, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Eirik S Nilssen

    Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience and Centre for Neural Computation, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-6997-3343
  6. Cliff Kentros

    Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience and Centre for Neural Computation, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Menno P Witter

    Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience and Centre for Neural Computation, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
    For correspondence
    menno.witter@ntnu.no
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-0285-1637

Funding

Kavli Foundation (endowment)

  • Menno P Witter

Norwegian Research Council (infrastructure grant NORBRAIN,#197467)

  • Menno P Witter

Norwegian Research Council (the Centre of Excellence scheme - Centre for Neural Computation,#223262)

  • Menno P Witter

Norwegian Research Council (research grant,# 227769)

  • Menno P Witter

Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (KAKENHI,#19K06917)

  • Shinya Ohara

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: All experiments were approved by the local ethics committee and were in accordance with the European Communities Council Directive and the Norwegian Experiments on Animals Act (#17898, #22312).

Reviewing Editor

  1. Katalin Toth, University of Ottawa, Canada

Publication history

  1. Received: February 5, 2021
  2. Accepted: March 25, 2021
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: March 26, 2021 (version 1)

Copyright

© 2021, Ohara et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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