Perception of a conserved family of plant signalling peptides by the receptor kinase HSL3

  1. Jack Rhodes
  2. Andra-Octavia Roman
  3. Marta Bjornson
  4. Benjamin Brandt
  5. Paul Derbyshire
  6. Michele Wyler
  7. Marc W Schmid
  8. Frank LH Menke
  9. Julia Santiago
  10. Cyril Zipfel  Is a corresponding author
  1. The Sainsbury Laboratory, United Kingdom
  2. University of Lausanne, Switzerland
  3. University of Zurich, Switzerland
  4. The Sainsbury Laboratory,, United Kingdom
  5. MWSchmid GmbH, Switzerland

Abstract

Plant genomes encode hundreds of secreted peptides; however, relatively few have been characterised. We report here an uncharacterised, stress-induced family of plant signalling peptides, which we call CTNIPs. Based on the role of the common co-receptor BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE 1-ASSOCIATED KINASE 1 (BAK1) in CTNIP-induced responses, we identified in Arabidopsis thaliana the orphan receptor kinase HAESA-LIKE 3 (HSL3) as the CTNIP receptor via a proteomics approach. CTNIP binding, ligand-triggered complex formation with BAK1, and induced downstream responses all involve HSL3. Notably, the HSL3-CTNIP signalling module is evolutionarily conserved amongst most extant angiosperms. The identification of this novel signalling module will further shed light on the diverse functions played by plant signalling peptides and will provide insights into receptor-ligand co-evolution.

Data availability

The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE (Perez-Riverol et al., 2016) partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD029264 and 10.6019/PXD029264The RNA-seq datasets generated and analysed in the current study have been deposited in the ArrayExpress database at EMBL-EBI (www.ebi.ac.uk/arrayexpress) under accession number E-MTAB-11093.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Jack Rhodes

    The Sainsbury Laboratory, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-3953-1648
  2. Andra-Octavia Roman

    Department of Plant Molecular Biology, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-3037-3321
  3. Marta Bjornson

    Institute of Plant and Microbial Biology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-8275-4521
  4. Benjamin Brandt

    Institute of Plant and Microbial Biology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-5867-8760
  5. Paul Derbyshire

    The Sainsbury Laboratory,, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Michele Wyler

    MWSchmid GmbH, Glarus, Switzerland
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-1097-5322
  7. Marc W Schmid

    MWSchmid GmbH, Glarus, Switzerland
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  8. Frank LH Menke

    The Sainsbury Laboratory, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-2490-4824
  9. Julia Santiago

    Department of Plant Molecular Biology, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  10. Cyril Zipfel

    Department of Plant Molecular Biology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
    For correspondence
    cyril.zipfel@botinst.uzh.ch
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-4935-8583

Funding

H2020 European Research Council (773153)

  • Cyril Zipfel

H2020 European Research Council (716358)

  • Julia Santiago

The Gatsby Charitable Foundation

  • Cyril Zipfel

Universität Zürich

  • Cyril Zipfel

Swiss National Science Foundation (31003A_182625)

  • Cyril Zipfel

Swiss National Science Foundation (31003A_173101)

  • Julia Santiago

Fondation philanthropique Famille Sandoz

  • Julia Santiago

H2020 Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions (703954)

  • Marta Bjornson

Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BB/P012574/1)

  • Cyril Zipfel

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Caroline Gutjahr, Technical University of Munich, Germany

Publication history

  1. Received: October 13, 2021
  2. Preprint posted: October 26, 2021 (view preprint)
  3. Accepted: May 26, 2022
  4. Accepted Manuscript published: May 26, 2022 (version 1)
  5. Version of Record published: June 13, 2022 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2022, Rhodes et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Jack Rhodes
  2. Andra-Octavia Roman
  3. Marta Bjornson
  4. Benjamin Brandt
  5. Paul Derbyshire
  6. Michele Wyler
  7. Marc W Schmid
  8. Frank LH Menke
  9. Julia Santiago
  10. Cyril Zipfel
(2022)
Perception of a conserved family of plant signalling peptides by the receptor kinase HSL3
eLife 11:e74687.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.74687

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