Mir155 regulates osteogenesis and bone mass phenotype via targeting S1pr1 gene

  1. Zhichao Zheng
  2. Lihong Wu
  3. Zhicong Li
  4. Ruoshu Tang
  5. Hongtao Li
  6. Yinyin Huang
  7. Tianqi Wang
  8. Shaofen Xu
  9. Haoyu Cheng
  10. Zhitong Ye
  11. Dong Xiao
  12. Xiaolin Lin
  13. Gang Wu  Is a corresponding author
  14. Richard T Jaspers  Is a corresponding author
  15. Janak L. Pathak  Is a corresponding author
  1. Affiliated Stomatology Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, China
  2. First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, China
  3. Southern Medical University, China
  4. Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands

Abstract

MicroRNA-155 (miR155) is overexpressed in various inflammatory diseases and cancer, in which bone resorption and osteolysis are frequently observed. However, the role of miR155 on osteogenesis and bone mass phenotype is still unknown. Here, we report a low bone mass phenotype in the long bone of Mir155-Tg mice compared with wild-type mice. In contrast, Mir155-KO mice showed a high bone mass phenotype and protective effect against inflammation-induced bone loss. Mir155-KO mice showed robust bone regeneration in the ectopic and orthotopic model, but Mir155-Tg mice showed compromised bone regeneration compared with the wild-type mice. Similarly, the osteogenic differentiation potential of bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) from Mir155-KO mice was robust and Mir155-Tg was compromised compared with that of wild-type mice. Moreover, Mir155 knockdown in BMSCs from wild-type mice showed higher osteogenic differentiation potential, supporting the results from Mir155-KO mice. TargetScan analysis predicted S1pr1 as a target gene of Mir155, which was further confirmed by luciferase assay and Mir155 knockdown. S1pr1 overexpression in BMSCs robustly promoted osteogenic differentiation without affecting cell viability and proliferation. Furthermore, osteoclastogenic differentiation of Mir155-Tg bone marrow-derived macrophages was inhibited compared with that of wild-type mice. Thus, Mir155 showed a catabolic effect on osteogenesis and bone mass phenotype via interaction with the S1pr1 gene, suggesting inhibition of Mir155 as a potential strategy for bone regeneration and bone defect healing.

Data availability

Source data files have been provided as Figure 1 source data-1, Figure 2 source data-2, Figure 3 source data-3, Figure 4 source data-4, Figure 5 source data-5, Figure 6 source data-6, Figure 7 source data-7, Figure 8 source data-8, Figure 9 source data-9, Figure S1 source data-S1.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Zhichao Zheng

    Affiliated Stomatology Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Lihong Wu

    Affiliated Stomatology Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-4561-9400
  3. Zhicong Li

    Affiliated Stomatology Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Ruoshu Tang

    Affiliated Stomatology Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Hongtao Li

    First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Yinyin Huang

    Affiliated Stomatology Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Tianqi Wang

    Affiliated Stomatology Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  8. Shaofen Xu

    Affiliated Stomatology Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  9. Haoyu Cheng

    Affiliated Stomatology Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  10. Zhitong Ye

    Affiliated Stomatology Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  11. Dong Xiao

    Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  12. Xiaolin Lin

    Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  13. Gang Wu

    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands
    For correspondence
    g.wu@acta.nl
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  14. Richard T Jaspers

    Department of Human Movement Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands
    For correspondence
    r.t.jaspers@vu.nl
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-6951-0952
  15. Janak L. Pathak

    Affiliated Stomatology Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China
    For correspondence
    j.pathak@gzhmu.edu.cn
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-2576-443X

Funding

The Science and Techonolgoy program of Guangzhou (202201010073)

  • Lihong Wu

The Science and Technology program of Guangzhou (202201020116)

  • Zhichao Zheng

The National Natural Science Foundation of China (U22A20159)

  • Lihong Wu

The National Natural Science Foundation of China (82150410451)

  • Janak L. Pathak

The General Guiding Project of Guangzhou (20201A011105)

  • Zhichao Zheng

The Medical Scientific Research Foundation of Guangdong Province (B2020027)

  • Zhichao Zheng

The Undergraduate Science and Technology Innovation Project of Guangzhou Medical University (2020A049)

  • Ruoshu Tang

The High-level University Construction Founding of Guangzhou Medical University (02-412-B205002-1003017,06-410-2106035)

  • Janak L. Pathak

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Ritu Trivedi, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, India

Ethics

Animal experimentation: The animal experiment was conducted in accordance with the guidelines approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee of the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China (2017-078).

Version history

  1. Received: February 9, 2022
  2. Preprint posted: February 19, 2022 (view preprint)
  3. Accepted: January 3, 2023
  4. Accepted Manuscript published: January 4, 2023 (version 1)
  5. Version of Record published: January 13, 2023 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2023, Zheng et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Zhichao Zheng
  2. Lihong Wu
  3. Zhicong Li
  4. Ruoshu Tang
  5. Hongtao Li
  6. Yinyin Huang
  7. Tianqi Wang
  8. Shaofen Xu
  9. Haoyu Cheng
  10. Zhitong Ye
  11. Dong Xiao
  12. Xiaolin Lin
  13. Gang Wu
  14. Richard T Jaspers
  15. Janak L. Pathak
(2023)
Mir155 regulates osteogenesis and bone mass phenotype via targeting S1pr1 gene
eLife 12:e77742.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.77742

Share this article

https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.77742

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