A low-cost, open-source evolutionary bioreactor and its educational use

  1. Vishhvaan Gopalakrishnan
  2. Dena Crozier
  3. Kyle J Card
  4. Lacy D Chick
  5. Nikhil P Krishnan
  6. Erin McClure
  7. Julia Pelesko
  8. Drew FK Williamson
  9. Daniel Nichol
  10. Soumyajit Mandal
  11. Robert A. Bonomo
  12. Jacob G Scott  Is a corresponding author
  1. Cleveland Clinic, United States
  2. Hawken School, United States
  3. Case Western Reserve University, United States
  4. Massachusetts General Hospital, United States
  5. Institute of Cancer Research, United Kingdom
  6. Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, United States

Abstract

A morbidostat is a bioreactor that uses antibiotics to control the growth of bacteria, making it well-suited for studying the evolution of antibiotic resistance. However, morbidostats are often too expensive to be used in educational settings. Here we present a low-cost morbidostat called the EVolutionary biorEactor (EVE) that can be built by students with minimal engineering and programming experience. We describe how we validated EVE in a real classroom setting by evolving replicate Escherichia coli populations under chloramphenicol challenge, thereby enabling students to learn about bacterial growth and antibiotic resistance.

Data availability

We provide the materials to build an EVE on our Github: https://github.com/vishhvaan/eve-pi. We have also included the data to generate figure 2 on the Github.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Vishhvaan Gopalakrishnan

    Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-0532-7710
  2. Dena Crozier

    Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-1841-0011
  3. Kyle J Card

    Department of Translational Hematology and Oncology Research, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-0462-2777
  4. Lacy D Chick

    Hawken School, Gates Mills, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-3059-4300
  5. Nikhil P Krishnan

    Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Erin McClure

    Department of Translational Hematology and Oncology Research, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-6604-1273
  7. Julia Pelesko

    Department of Translational Hematology and Oncology Research, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  8. Drew FK Williamson

    Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-1745-8846
  9. Daniel Nichol

    Centre for Evolution and Cancer, Institute of Cancer Research, London, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-2662-1836
  10. Soumyajit Mandal

    Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  11. Robert A. Bonomo

    Department of Medicine, Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, Cleveland, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  12. Jacob G Scott

    Louis Stokes Cleveland Department of Veteran Affairs Medical Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, United States
    For correspondence
    scottj10@ccf.org
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-2971-7673

Funding

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Peter Rodgers, eLife, United Kingdom

Publication history

  1. Preprint posted: August 9, 2019 (view preprint)
  2. Received: August 30, 2022
  3. Accepted: October 20, 2022
  4. Accepted Manuscript published: November 1, 2022 (version 1)
  5. Version of Record published: November 23, 2022 (version 2)

Copyright

This is an open-access article, free of all copyright, and may be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, modified, built upon, or otherwise used by anyone for any lawful purpose. The work is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication.

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  1. Vishhvaan Gopalakrishnan
  2. Dena Crozier
  3. Kyle J Card
  4. Lacy D Chick
  5. Nikhil P Krishnan
  6. Erin McClure
  7. Julia Pelesko
  8. Drew FK Williamson
  9. Daniel Nichol
  10. Soumyajit Mandal
  11. Robert A. Bonomo
  12. Jacob G Scott
(2022)
A low-cost, open-source evolutionary bioreactor and its educational use
eLife 11:e83067.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.83067
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