Evolutionary Biology

Evolutionary Biology

eLife publishes research spanning behavior, morphology, evolution of developmental processes, palaeontology, experimental evolution and evolutionary theory. Learn more about what we publish and sign up for the latest research.
Illustration by Davide Bonazzi

Latest articles

    1. Evolutionary Biology
    2. Genetics and Genomics

    Independent amylase gene copy number bursts correlate with dietary preferences in mammals

    Petar Pajic et al.
    Comprehensive analyses of amylase duplications and salivary activity across mammals underscore the importance of recurrent copy number variation as a flexible and rapid evolutionary mechanism.
    1. Evolutionary Biology
    2. Genetics and Genomics

    Evolution: Of starch and spit

    Mareike C Janiak
    Animals living alongside humans have multiple copies of the gene for alpha-amylase, the enzyme that breaks down starchy foods, and high levels of this protein in their saliva.
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    1. Evolutionary Biology

    A non-archaeopterygid avialan theropod from the Late Jurassic of southern Germany

    Oliver WM Rauhut et al.
    A new taxon from the Late Jurassic of southern Germany represents the second volant bird known from that time period and documents the improvement of flapping flight in bird evolution.
    1. Evolutionary Biology
    2. Physics of Living Systems

    Environmental heterogeneity can tip the population genetics of range expansions

    Matti Gralka, Oskar Hallatschek
    Environmental heterogeneity can dramatically reduce the efficacy of selection and alter the neutral evolutionary dynamics in microbial range expansions.
    1. Ecology
    2. Evolutionary Biology

    Signal categorization by foraging animals depends on ecological diversity

    David William Kikuchi et al.
    In richer, more even communities, foragers form broad categories among their food resources that can select for convergence among signals, including mimetic resemblances.
    1. Evolutionary Biology

    Host-pathogen coevolution increases genetic variation in susceptibility to infection

    Elizabeth ML Duxbury et al.
    A history of coevolution increases genetic variation in the susceptibility of Drosophila to viruses, largely by introducing major-effect resistance polymorphisms into populations.
    1. Ecology
    2. Evolutionary Biology

    The African ape-like foot of Ardipithecus ramidus and its implications for the origin of bipedalism

    Thomas Cody Prang
    The most recent common ancestor of humans, chimpanzees, and bonobos possessed a foot adapted to terrestrial quadrupedalism and climbing.

Senior editors

  1. Diethard Tautz
    Max-Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Germany
  2. Detlef Weigel
    Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Germany
  3. Patricia Wittkopp
    University of Michigan, United States
  4. See more editors