Figure 2—figure supplement 1. | A quantitative framework for whole-body coordination reveals specific deficits in freely walking ataxic mice

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A quantitative framework for whole-body coordination reveals specific deficits in freely walking ataxic mice

Figure 2—figure supplement 1.

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Champalimaud Foundation, Portugal
Figure 2—figure supplement 1.
Download figureOpen in new tabFigure 2—figure supplement 1. Using linear mixed effects models to predict basic stride parameters.

(A) Properties of wildtype mice used for linear mixed-effects model. A total of 34 wild-type C57BL/6 mice were used for the linear mixed-effects model in Figure 2. Each individual WT animal is plotted as a circle (open circles, females, N = 11; closed circles, males, N = 23). Symbols are color-coded by age. The diverse group included a variety of ages (30–114 days), body lengths (61–100 mm), and weights (7–33g). (B) Comparison of model fits for basic stride parameters. Speed, gender, age, body length, weight (fixed terms) and subject (random term) were used as predictor variables in the linear mixed-effects model. Table rows show tested equations for predicting stride parameters and values used for selection criteria of the resulting predictive model. p-values reported for each term are the outcome of a likelihood ratio test comparing indicated equations (superscripts). The last two lines (f, g) indicate that age and gender did not improve the predictions beyond the inclusion of speed and body weight. (C) Coefficients of speed and weight for basic stride parameters. The final equations for each stride parameter included speed and weight as fixed-term predictor variables; subject was included as a random-term. Coefficient values for fixed terms are represented. These equations can be used to predict stride parameters for a given mouse walking at a particular speed.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07892.008