Figure 9. | Measurements and models of electric fields in the in vivo human brain during transcranial electric stimulation

Open accessCopyright infoDownload PDFDownload figuresRelated content

Measurements and models of electric fields in the in vivo human brain during transcranial electric stimulation

Figure 9.

Affiliation details

City College of the City University of New York, United States; New York University School of Medicine, United States; Mayo Clinic, United States
Figure 9.
Download figureOpen in new tabFigure 9. Performance of various modeling approaches.

IM-CSF: This ‘intact model’ is based on the pre-surgical MRI and does not include craniotomy, recording electrodes, etc., and does not model CSF either; IM: intact model including CSF; RMcut: realistic model with all details as shown in Figure 4A–F, but truncated at the bottom of the skull due to the limited FOV of the clinical MRI scans; RM: realistic model with an extended FOV including the lower head and neck based on a standard head model; RM + 3skull: realistic model including 3-compartment skull as shown in Figure 4G; RM+DTI: realistic model including DTI as shown in Figure 4H. Four different ways to convert DTI ellipsoids into estimated anisotropic conductivity values were tested: direct method (DTI), volume normalized (DTI/VN), volume constrained (DTI/VC), and equivalent isotropic trace (DTI/EIT). What is demonstrated is that truncated head models may deteriorate prediction accuracy, and models accounting for CSF, multiple skull compartments or white matter tracts do not significantly improve model accuracy.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18834.012