1. Cell Biology
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Mother-daughter asymmetry of pH underlies aging and rejuvenation in yeast

  1. Kiersten A Henderson
  2. Adam L Hughes
  3. Daniel E Gottschling  Is a corresponding author
  1. Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, United States
  2. University of Utah, United States
  3. Fred Hutchison Cancer Research Center, United States
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Cite this article as: eLife 2014;3:e03504 doi: 10.7554/eLife.03504

Abstract

Replicative aging in yeast is asymmetric - mother cells age but their daughter cells are rejuvenated. Here we identify an asymmetry in pH between mother and daughter cells that underlies aging and rejuvenation. Cytosolic pH increases in aging mother cells, but is more acidic in daughter cells. This is due to the asymmetric distribution of the major regulator of cytosolic pH, the plasma membrane proton ATPase (Pma1). Pma1 accumulates in aging mother cells, but is largely absent from nascent daughter cells. We previously found that acidity of the vacuole declines in aging mother cells and limits lifespan, but that daughter cell vacuoles re-acidify. We find that Pma1 activity antagonizes mother cell vacuole acidity by reducing cytosolic protons. However, the inherent asymmetry of Pma1 increases cytosolic proton availability in daughter cells and facilitates vacuole re-acidification and rejuvenation.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Kiersten A Henderson

    Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Adam L Hughes

    University of Utah, Salt Lake City, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Daniel E Gottschling

    Fred Hutchison Cancer Research Center, Seattle, United States
    For correspondence
    dgottsch@fhcrc.org
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Karsten Weis, ETH Zürich, Switzerland

Publication history

  1. Received: May 28, 2014
  2. Accepted: September 3, 2014
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: September 4, 2014 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: September 26, 2014 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2014, Henderson et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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