1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
  2. Genetics and Genomics
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Protein kinase C coordinates histone H3 phosphorylation and acetylation

  1. Zoulfia Darieva
  2. Aaron Webber
  3. Stacey Warwood
  4. Andrew D Sharrocks  Is a corresponding author
  1. University of Manchester, United Kingdom
Research Article
  • Cited 7
  • Views 1,690
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Cite this article as: eLife 2015;4:e09886 doi: 10.7554/eLife.09886

Abstract

The re-assembly of chromatin following DNA replication is a critical event in the maintenance of genome integrity. Histone H3 acetylation at K56 and phosphorylation at T45 are two important chromatin modifications that accompany chromatin assembly. Here we have identified the protein kinase Pkc1 as a key regulator that coordinates the deposition of these modifications in S. cerevisiae under conditions of replicative stress. Pkc1 phosphorylates the histone acetyl transferase Rtt109 and promotes its ability to acetylate H3K56. Our data also reveal novel cross-talk between two different histone modifications as Pkc1 also enhances H3T45 phosphorylation and this modification is required for H3K56 acetylation. Our data therefore reveal an important role for Pkc1 in coordinating the deposition of two different histone modifications that are important for chromatin assembly.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Zoulfia Darieva

    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Aaron Webber

    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Stacey Warwood

    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Andrew D Sharrocks

    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom
    For correspondence
    andrew.d.sharrocks@manchester.ac.uk
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Jessica Tyler, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: July 5, 2015
  2. Accepted: October 14, 2015
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: October 15, 2015 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: December 9, 2015 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2015, Darieva et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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