1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
  2. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics
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Structure of RNA polymerase bound to ribosomal 30S subunit

  1. Gabriel Demo
  2. Aviram Rasouly
  3. Nikita Vasilyev
  4. Vladimir Svetlov
  5. Anna B Loveland
  6. Ruben Diaz-Avalos
  7. Nikolaus Grigorieff
  8. Evgeny Nudler  Is a corresponding author
  9. Andrei A Korostelev  Is a corresponding author
  1. University of Massachusetts Medical School, United States
  2. New York University School of Medicine, United States
  3. Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, United States
Research Article
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Cite this article as: eLife 2017;6:e28560 doi: 10.7554/eLife.28560

Abstract

In bacteria, mRNA transcription and translation are coupled to coordinate optimal gene expression and maintain genome stability. Coupling is thought to involve direct interactions between RNA polymerase (RNAP) and the translational machinery. We present cryo-EM structures of E. coli RNAP core bound to the small ribosomal 30S subunit. The complex is stable under cell-like ionic conditions, consistent with functional interaction between RNAP and the 30S subunit. The RNA exit tunnel of RNAP aligns with the Shine-Dalgarno-binding site of the 30S subunit. Ribosomal protein S1 forms a wall of the tunnel between RNAP and the 30S subunit, consistent with its role in directing mRNAs onto the ribosome. The nucleic-acid-binding cleft of RNAP samples distinct conformations, suggesting different functional states during transcription-translation coupling. The architecture of the 30S•RNAP complex provides a structural basis for co-localization of the transcriptional and translational machineries, and inform future mechanistic studies of coupled transcription and translation.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Gabriel Demo

    RNA Therapeutics Institute, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  2. Aviram Rasouly

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  3. Nikita Vasilyev

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  4. Vladimir Svetlov

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  5. Anna B Loveland

    RNA Therapeutics Institute, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  6. Ruben Diaz-Avalos

    Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  7. Nikolaus Grigorieff

    Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, United States
    Competing interests
    Nikolaus Grigorieff, Reviewing editor, eLife.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-1506-909X
  8. Evgeny Nudler

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, United States
    For correspondence
    evgeny.nudler@nyumc.org
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-8811-3071
  9. Andrei A Korostelev

    RNA Therapeutics Institute, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, United States
    For correspondence
    andrei.korostelev@umassmed.edu
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-1588-717X

Funding

National Institutes of Health (GM106105)

  • Andrei A Korostelev

National Institutes of Health (GM107465)

  • Andrei A Korostelev

National Institutes of Health (GM107329)

  • Evgeny Nudler

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Rachel Green, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: May 11, 2017
  2. Accepted: October 11, 2017
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: October 13, 2017 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: October 24, 2017 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2017, Demo et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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