1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
  2. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics
Download icon

Mechanochemical coupling and bi-phasic force-velocity dependence in the ultra-fast ring ATPase SpoIIIE

  1. Ninning Liu
  2. Gheorghe Chistol
  3. Yuanbo Cui
  4. Carlos Bustamante  Is a corresponding author
  1. University of California, Berkeley, United States
Research Advance
  • Cited 2
  • Views 1,293
  • Annotations
Cite this article as: eLife 2018;7:e32354 doi: 10.7554/eLife.32354

Abstract

Multi-subunit ring-shaped ATPases are molecular motors that harness chemical free energy to perform vital mechanical tasks such as polypeptide translocation, DNA unwinding, and chromosome segregation. Previously we reported the intersubunit coordination and stepping behavior of the hexameric ring-shaped ATPase SpoIIIE (Liu et al., 2015). Here we use optical tweezers to characterize the motor's mechanochemistry. Analysis of the motor response to external force at various nucleotide concentrations identifies phosphate release as the likely force-generating step. Analysis of SpoIIIE pausing indicates that pauses are off-pathway events. Characterization of SpoIIIE slipping behavior reveals that individual motor subunits engage DNA upon ATP binding. Furthermore, we find that SpoIIIE's velocity exhibits an intriguing bi-phasic dependence on force. We hypothesize that this behavior is an adaptation of ultra-fast motors tasked with translocating DNA from which they must also remove DNA-bound protein roadblocks. Based on these results, we formulate a comprehensive mechanochemical model for SpoIIIE.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Ninning Liu

    Jason L Choy Laboratory of Single Molecule Biophysics, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Gheorghe Chistol

    Jason L Choy Laboratory of Single Molecule Biophysics, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Yuanbo Cui

    Jason L Choy Laboratory of Single Molecule Biophysics, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Carlos Bustamante

    Jason L Choy Laboratory of Single Molecule Biophysics, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, United States
    For correspondence
    carlosb@berkeley.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-2970-0073

Funding

Howard Hughes Medical Institute

  • Carlos Bustamante

National Institutes of Health (R01GM071552)

  • Carlos Bustamante

National Institutes of Health (R01GM032543)

  • Carlos Bustamante

U.S. Department of Energy (DE-AC02-05CH11231)

  • Carlos Bustamante

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Taekjip Ha, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: November 22, 2017
  2. Accepted: March 3, 2018
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: March 5, 2018 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: March 19, 2018 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2018, Liu et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

Metrics

  • 1,293
    Page views
  • 210
    Downloads
  • 2
    Citations

Article citation count generated by polling the highest count across the following sources: Crossref, PubMed Central, Scopus.

Download links

A two-part list of links to download the article, or parts of the article, in various formats.

Downloads (link to download the article as PDF)

Download citations (links to download the citations from this article in formats compatible with various reference manager tools)

Open citations (links to open the citations from this article in various online reference manager services)

Further reading

    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    2. Cell Biology
    Janani Gopalan et al.
    Research Article Updated

    Pathophysiological defects in water homeostasis can lead to renal failure. Likewise, common genetic disorders associated with abnormal cytoskeletal dynamics in the kidney collecting ducts and perturbed calcium and cAMP signaling in the ciliary compartment contribute to chronic kidney failure. We show that collecting ducts in mice lacking the A-Kinase anchoring protein AKAP220 exhibit enhanced development of primary cilia. Mechanistic studies reveal that AKAP220-associated protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) mediates this phenotype by promoting changes in the stability of histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) with concomitant defects in actin dynamics. This proceeds through a previously unrecognized adaptor function for PP1 as all ciliogenesis and cytoskeletal phenotypes are recapitulated in mIMCD3 knock-in cells expressing a phosphatase-targeting defective AKAP220-ΔPP1 mutant. Pharmacological blocking of local HDAC6 activity alters cilia development and reduces cystogenesis in kidney-on-chip and organoid models. These findings identify the AKAP220-PPI-HDAC6 pathway as a key effector in primary cilia development.

    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    Urszula Nowicka et al.
    Research Article

    Mitochondria are organelles with their own genomes, but they rely on the import of nuclear-encoded proteins that are translated by cytosolic ribosomes. Therefore, it is important to understand whether failures in the mitochondrial uptake of these nuclear-encoded proteins can cause proteotoxic stress and identify response mechanisms that may counteract it. Here, we report that upon impairments in mitochondrial protein import, high-risk precursor and immature forms of mitochondrial proteins form aberrant deposits in the cytosol. These deposits then cause further cytosolic accumulation and consequently aggregation of other mitochondrial proteins and disease-related proteins, including α-synuclein and amyloid β. This aggregation triggers a cytosolic protein homeostasis imbalance that is accompanied by specific molecular chaperone responses at both the transcriptomic and protein levels. Altogether, our results provide evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction, specifically protein import defects, contributes to impairments in protein homeostasis, thus revealing a possible molecular mechanism by which mitochondria are involved in neurodegenerative diseases.