1. Neuroscience
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Stomach-brain synchrony reveals a novel, delayed-connectivity resting-state network in humans

  1. Ignacio Rebollo  Is a corresponding author
  2. Anne-Dominique Devauchelle
  3. Benoît Béranger
  4. Catherine Tallon-Baudry
  1. École normale supérieure, INSERM, PSL Research University, France
  2. Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle épinière - ICM, France
Research Article
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Cite this article as: eLife 2018;7:e33321 doi: 10.7554/eLife.33321

Abstract

Resting-state networks offer a unique window into the brain's functional architecture, but their characterization remains limited to instantaneous connectivity thus far. Here, we describe a novel resting-state network based on the delayed connectivity between the brain and the slow electrical rhythm (0.05 Hz) generated in the stomach. The gastric network cuts across classical resting-state networks with partial overlap with autonomic regulation areas. This network is composed of regions with convergent functional properties involved in mapping bodily space through touch, action or vision, as well as mapping external space in bodily coordinates. The network is characterized by a precise temporal sequence of activations within a gastric cycle, beginning with somato-motor cortices and ending with the extrastriate body area and dorsal precuneus. Our results demonstrate that canonical resting-state networks based on instantaneous connectivity represent only one of the possible partitions of the brain into coherent networks based on temporal dynamics.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Ignacio Rebollo

    Laboratoire de neurosciences cognitives, Département d'études cognitives, École normale supérieure, INSERM, PSL Research University, Paris, France
    For correspondence
    ignacio.rebollo@cri-paris.org
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-4119-9955
  2. Anne-Dominique Devauchelle

    Laboratoire de neurosciences cognitives, Département d'études cognitives, École normale supérieure, INSERM, PSL Research University, Paris, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Benoît Béranger

    Centre de NeuroImagerie de Recherche - CENIR, Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle épinière - ICM, Paris, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Catherine Tallon-Baudry

    Laboratoire de neurosciences cognitives, Département d'études cognitives, École normale supérieure, INSERM, PSL Research University, Paris, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-8480-5831

Funding

H2020 European Research Council (670325)

  • Catherine Tallon-Baudry

Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR-10-LABX-0087 IEC)

  • Catherine Tallon-Baudry

DIM cerveau et pensee

  • Ignacio Rebollo

Fondation Bettencourt Schueller

  • Ignacio Rebollo

Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR-10-IDEX-0001-02 PSL*)

  • Catherine Tallon-Baudry

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Ethics

Human subjects: Participants received provided written informed consent for participation in the experiment. The study was approved by the ethics committee Comité de Protection des Personnes Ile de France III

Reviewing Editor

  1. Hugo Critchley, University of Sussex, United Kingdom

Publication history

  1. Received: November 3, 2017
  2. Accepted: March 20, 2018
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: March 21, 2018 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: May 4, 2018 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2018, Rebollo et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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