A SoxB gene acts as an anterior gap gene and regulates posterior segment addition in a spider

  1. Christian Louis Bonatto Paese
  2. Anna Schoenauer
  3. Daniel J Leite
  4. Steven Russell
  5. Alistair P McGregor  Is a corresponding author
  1. Oxford Brookes University, United Kingdom
  2. University of Cambridge, United Kingdom

Abstract

Sox genes encode a set of highly conserved transcription factors that regulate many developmental processes. In insects, the SoxB gene Dichaete is the only Sox gene known to be involved in segmentation. To determine if similar mechanisms are used in other arthropods, we investigated the role of Sox genes during segmentation in the spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum. While Dichaete does not appear to be involved in spider segmentation, we found that the closely related Sox21b-1 gene acts as a gap gene during formation of anterior segments and is also part of the segmentation clock for development of the segment addition zone and sequential addition of opisthosomal segments. Thus, we have found that two different mechanisms of segmentation in a non-mandibulate arthropod are regulated by a SoxB gene. Our work provides new insights into the function of an important and conserved gene family, and the evolution of the regulation of segmentation in arthropods.

Data availability

All data generated or analysed during this study are included in the manuscript and supporting files

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Christian Louis Bonatto Paese

    Department of Biological and Medical Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-5992-5209
  2. Anna Schoenauer

    Department of Biological and Medical Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Daniel J Leite

    Department of Biological and Medical Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Steven Russell

    Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Alistair P McGregor

    Department of Biological and Medical Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom
    For correspondence
    amcgregor@brookes.ac.uk
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-2908-2420

Funding

Leverhulme Trust (RPG-2016-234)

  • Alistair P McGregor

Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BB/N007069/1)

  • Steven Russell

Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (234586/2014-1)

  • Christian Louis Bonatto Paese

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Nikola-Michael Prpic

Publication history

  1. Received: April 14, 2018
  2. Accepted: August 10, 2018
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: August 21, 2018 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: October 1, 2018 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2018, Bonatto Paese et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Christian Louis Bonatto Paese
  2. Anna Schoenauer
  3. Daniel J Leite
  4. Steven Russell
  5. Alistair P McGregor
(2018)
A SoxB gene acts as an anterior gap gene and regulates posterior segment addition in a spider
eLife 7:e37567.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.37567
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