1. Developmental Biology
  2. Immunology and Inflammation
Download icon

Chemokines: The cell sets the tone

  1. Jonna Alanko  Is a corresponding author
  2. Michael Sixt  Is a corresponding author
  1. Institute of Science and Technology Austria, Austria
Insight
Cite this article as: eLife 2018;7:e37888 doi: 10.7554/eLife.37888
1 figure

Figures

Chemokines trigger a 'yes or no' response in cells.

(A) When a chemokine (blue, green or brown line) binds to a chemokine receptor (black lines) embedded in the plasma membrane (PM; grey) of a cell, a G protein formed of three subunits (α, ß, γ), one of which (α) is attached to a molecule called GDP, is recruited. The GDP is then replaced with a molecule known as GTP, the G protein dissociates, and the different subunits go on to activate a range of different cellular pathways. (B) Different models can explain how chemokines signal within a cell. In the first model (left), different chemokines (L1, L2, L3) bind to their corresponding receptors (R1, R2, R3) and activate a generic G protein mediated pathway (G) in two types of cells (in yellow and green). The final response (RE1, RE2) triggered by a chemokine is ultimately dependent on interpretation modules (depicted as cellular brains) that are specific to the cell type, rather than on the identity of the signaling chemokine-receptor complex. The second model (right) proposes that each chemokine-receptor pairs activates a specific cellular pathway that determines a particular cellular response. The work by Malhotra et al. supports the first model (Malhotra et al., 2018).

Download links

A two-part list of links to download the article, or parts of the article, in various formats.

Downloads (link to download the article as PDF)

Download citations (links to download the citations from this article in formats compatible with various reference manager tools)

Open citations (links to open the citations from this article in various online reference manager services)