1. Chromosomes and Gene Expression
  2. Genetics and Genomics
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Communication between distinct subunit interfaces of the cohesin complex promotes its topological entrapment of DNA

  1. Vincent Guacci
  2. Fiona Chatterjee
  3. Brett Robison
  4. Douglas E Koshland  Is a corresponding author
  1. University of California, Berkeley, United States
Research Article
  • Cited 5
  • Views 1,346
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Cite this article as: eLife 2019;8:e46347 doi: 10.7554/eLife.46347

Abstract

Cohesin mediates higher-order chromosome structure. Its biological activities require topological entrapment of DNA within a lumen(s) formed by cohesin subunits. The reversible dissociation of cohesin's Smc3p and Mcd1p subunits is postulated to form a regulated gate that allows DNA entry and exit into the lumen. We assessed gate-independent functions of this interface in yeast using a fusion protein that joins Smc3p to Mcd1p. We show that in vivo all the regulators of cohesin promote DNA binding of cohesion by mechanisms independent of opening this gate. Furthermore, we show that this interface has a gate-independent activity essential for cohesin to bind chromosomes. We propose this interface regulates DNA entrapment by controlling the opening and closing of one or more distal interfaces formed by cohesin subunits, likely by inducing a conformation change in cohesin. Furthermore, cohesin regulators modulate the interface to control both DNA entrapment and cohesin functions after DNA binding.

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All data generated in this study are included in the manuscript.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Vincent Guacci

    Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-0281-713X
  2. Fiona Chatterjee

    Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Brett Robison

    Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Douglas E Koshland

    Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, United States
    For correspondence
    koshland@berkeley.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-3742-6294

Funding

National Institutes of Health (1R35 GM-118189-01)

  • Douglas E Koshland

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Prasad Jallepalli, Johns Hopkins University, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: February 25, 2019
  2. Accepted: June 4, 2019
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: June 4, 2019 (version 1)
  4. Accepted Manuscript updated: June 4, 2019 (version 2)
  5. Version of Record published: June 17, 2019 (version 3)

Copyright

© 2019, Guacci et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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