1. Microbiology and Infectious Disease
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Interspecies interactions induce exploratory motility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

  1. Dominique H Limoli  Is a corresponding author
  2. Elizabeth A Warren
  3. Kaitlin D Yarrington
  4. Niles P Donegan
  5. Ambrose L Cheung
  6. George O'Toole
  1. University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, United States
  2. The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, United States
Research Article
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Cite this article as: eLife 2019;8:e47365 doi: 10.7554/eLife.47365

Abstract

Microbes often live in multispecies communities where interactions among community members impact both the individual constituents and the surrounding environment. Here, we developed a system to visualize interspecies behaviors at initial encounters. By imaging two prevalent pathogens known to be coisolated from chronic illnesses, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, we observed P. aeruginosa can modify surface motility in response to secreted factors from S. aureus. Upon sensing S. aureus, P. aeruginosa transitioned from collective to single-cell motility with an associated increase in speed and directedness - a behavior we refer to as 'exploratory motility'. Explorer cells moved preferentially towards S. aureus and invaded S. aureus colonies through the action of the type IV pili. These studies reveal previously undescribed motility behaviors and lend insight into how P. aeruginosa senses and responds to other species. Identifying strategies to harness these interactions may open avenues for new antimicrobial strategies.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Dominique H Limoli

    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, United States
    For correspondence
    dominique-limoli@uiowa.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-4130-337X
  2. Elizabeth A Warren

    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Kaitlin D Yarrington

    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Niles P Donegan

    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-8328-2044
  5. Ambrose L Cheung

    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. George O'Toole

    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Funding

Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (Postdoctoral Fellowship LIMOLI15F0)

  • Dominique H Limoli

Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF Postdoc-to-Faculty Transition Award LIMOLI18F5)

  • Dominique H Limoli

National Institutes of Health (Grant R37 AI83256)

  • George O'Toole

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Dianne K Newman, California Institute of Technology, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: April 3, 2019
  2. Accepted: October 30, 2019
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: November 12, 2019 (version 1)

Copyright

© 2019, Limoli et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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