ERK3/MAPK6 controls IL-8 production and chemotaxis

  1. Katarzyna Bogucka
  2. Malvika Pompaiah
  3. Federico Marini
  4. Harald Binder
  5. Gregory Harms
  6. Manuel Kaulich
  7. Matthias Klein
  8. Christian Michel
  9. Markus P Radsak
  10. Sebastian Rosigkeit
  11. Peter Grimminger
  12. Hansjörg Schild
  13. Krishnaraj Rajalingam  Is a corresponding author
  1. Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany
  2. Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany
  3. Institute for Immunology/ University Medical Center Mainz, Germany
  4. University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Germany

Abstract

ERK3 is a ubiquitously expressed member of the atypical mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and the physiological significance of its short half-life remains unclear. By employing gastrointestinal 3D organoids, we detect that ERK3 protein levels steadily decrease during epithelial differentiation. ERK3 is not required for 3D growth of human gastric epithelium. However, ERK3 is stabilized and activated in tumourigenic cells, but deteriorates over time in primary cells in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). ERK3 is necessary for production of several cellular factors including interleukin-8 (IL-8), in both, normal and tumourigenic cells. Particularly, ERK3 is critical for AP-1 signaling through its interaction and regulation of c-Jun protein. The secretome of ERK3 deficient cells is defective in chemotaxis of neutrophils and monocytes both in vitro and in vivo. Further, knockdown of ERK3 reduces metastatic potential of invasive breast cancer cells. We unveil an ERK3-mediated regulation of IL-8 and epithelial secretome for chemotaxis.

Data availability

The RNA-seq data presented in this manuscript have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus and are accessible through GEO series accession number GSE136002 (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE136002)

The following data sets were generated

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Katarzyna Bogucka

    Cell Biology Unit, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Mainz, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Malvika Pompaiah

    Cell Biology Unit, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Mainz, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Federico Marini

    Institute of Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Mainz, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-3252-7758
  4. Harald Binder

    IMBEI, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Mainz, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Gregory Harms

    Cell Biology Unit, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Mainz, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Manuel Kaulich

    Institute of Biochemistry II, Goethe University Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-9528-8822
  7. Matthias Klein

    Institute of Immunology, Institute for Immunology/ University Medical Center Mainz, Mainz, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  8. Christian Michel

    Department of Hematology, Medical Oncology, & Pneumology, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Mainz, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  9. Markus P Radsak

    Department of Hematology, Medical Oncology, & Pneumology, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Mainz, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  10. Sebastian Rosigkeit

    Cell Biology Unit, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Mainz, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  11. Peter Grimminger

    Department of General, visceral and transplantation surgery, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Mainz, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  12. Hansjörg Schild

    Department of Immunology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  13. Krishnaraj Rajalingam

    Cell Biology Unit, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Mainz, Germany
    For correspondence
    krishna@uni-mainz.de
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-4175-9633

Funding

Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (RA1739/4-1)

  • Krishnaraj Rajalingam

Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (CRC1292)

  • Katarzyna Bogucka

Merck KGaA (ERK-KR)

  • Krishnaraj Rajalingam

Else Kröner-Fresenius-Stiftung (SUNMAPK)

  • Malvika Pompaiah

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: The animalexperiment was performed under the permission (G16-1-026) of the National Investigation Office Rheinland-Pfalz and conducted according to the German Animal Protection Law

Human subjects: Tissue samples employed are obtained from the biobank of the university medical center. Written informed consent was obtained from all patients, and the study was approved by the ethical committee at the University Medical Center of the JGU Mainz (approval # 837.100.16 (10419).

Reviewing Editor

  1. Yuting Ma, Suzhou Institute of Systems Medicine, China

Version history

  1. Received: October 7, 2019
  2. Accepted: April 17, 2020
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: April 21, 2020 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: April 30, 2020 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2020, Bogucka et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

Metrics

  • 3,891
    Page views
  • 417
    Downloads
  • 21
    Citations

Article citation count generated by polling the highest count across the following sources: Crossref, PubMed Central, Scopus.

Download links

A two-part list of links to download the article, or parts of the article, in various formats.

Downloads (link to download the article as PDF)

Open citations (links to open the citations from this article in various online reference manager services)

Cite this article (links to download the citations from this article in formats compatible with various reference manager tools)

  1. Katarzyna Bogucka
  2. Malvika Pompaiah
  3. Federico Marini
  4. Harald Binder
  5. Gregory Harms
  6. Manuel Kaulich
  7. Matthias Klein
  8. Christian Michel
  9. Markus P Radsak
  10. Sebastian Rosigkeit
  11. Peter Grimminger
  12. Hansjörg Schild
  13. Krishnaraj Rajalingam
(2020)
ERK3/MAPK6 controls IL-8 production and chemotaxis
eLife 9:e52511.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.52511

Share this article

https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.52511

Further reading

    1. Cell Biology
    2. Chromosomes and Gene Expression
    Carolline Ascenção, Jennie R Sims ... Marcus B Smolka
    Research Article

    Meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) is a critical feature of meiotic prophase I progression in males. While the ATR kinase and its activator TOPBP1 are key drivers of MSCI within the specialized sex body (SB) domain of the nucleus, how they promote silencing remains unclear given their multifaceted meiotic functions that also include DNA repair, chromosome synapsis, and SB formation. Here we report a novel mutant mouse harboring mutations in the TOPBP1-BRCT5 domain. Topbp1B5/B5 males are infertile, with impaired MSCI despite displaying grossly normal events of early prophase I, including synapsis and SB formation. Specific ATR-dependent events are disrupted, including phosphorylation and localization of the RNA:DNA helicase Senataxin. Topbp1B5/B5 spermatocytes initiate, but cannot maintain ongoing, MSCI. These findings reveal a non-canonical role for the ATR-TOPBP1 signaling axis in MSCI dynamics at advanced stages in pachynema and establish the first mouse mutant that separates ATR signaling and MSCI from SB formation.

    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    2. Cell Biology
    Kristian Davidsen, Jonathan S Marvin ... Lucas B Sullivan
    Research Article

    Intracellular levels of the amino acid aspartate are responsive to changes in metabolism in mammalian cells and can correspondingly alter cell function, highlighting the need for robust tools to measure aspartate abundance. However, comprehensive understanding of aspartate metabolism has been limited by the throughput, cost, and static nature of the mass spectrometry (MS)-based measurements that are typically employed to measure aspartate levels. To address these issues, we have developed a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based sensor of aspartate (jAspSnFR3), where the fluorescence intensity corresponds to aspartate concentration. As a purified protein, the sensor has a 20-fold increase in fluorescence upon aspartate saturation, with dose-dependent fluorescence changes covering a physiologically relevant aspartate concentration range and no significant off target binding. Expressed in mammalian cell lines, sensor intensity correlated with aspartate levels measured by MS and could resolve temporal changes in intracellular aspartate from genetic, pharmacological, and nutritional manipulations. These data demonstrate the utility of jAspSnFR3 and highlight the opportunities it provides for temporally resolved and high-throughput applications of variables that affect aspartate levels.