1. Developmental Biology
  2. Neuroscience
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Low FoxO expression in Drosophila somatosensory neurons protects dendrite growth under nutrient restriction

  1. Amy R Poe
  2. Yineng Xu
  3. Christine Zhang
  4. Joyce Lei
  5. Kailyn Li
  6. David Labib
  7. Chun Han  Is a corresponding author
  1. Cornell University, United States
Research Article
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Cite this article as: eLife 2020;9:e53351 doi: 10.7554/eLife.53351

Abstract

During prolonged nutrient restriction, developing animals redistribute vital nutrients to favor brain growth at the expense of other organs. In Drosophila, such brain sparing relies on a glia-derived growth factor to sustain proliferation of neural stem cells. However, whether other aspects of neural development are also spared under nutrient restriction is unknown. Here we show that dynamically growing somatosensory neurons in the Drosophila peripheral nervous system exhibit organ sparing at the level of arbor growth: Under nutrient stress, sensory dendrites preferentially grow as compared to neighboring non-neural tissues, resulting in dendrite overgrowth. These neurons express lower levels of the stress sensor FoxO than neighboring epidermal cells, and hence exhibit no marked induction of autophagy and a milder suppression of Tor signaling under nutrient stress. Preferential dendrite growth allows for heightened animal responses to sensory stimuli, indicative of a potential survival advantage under environmental challenges.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Amy R Poe

    Weill Institute for Cell and Molecular Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Yineng Xu

    Weill Institute for Cell and Molecular Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Christine Zhang

    Weill Institute for Cell and Molecular Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Joyce Lei

    Weill Institute for Cell and Molecular Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Kailyn Li

    Weill Institute for Cell and Molecular Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. David Labib

    Weill Institute for Cell and Molecular Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Chun Han

    Weill Institute for Cell and Molecular Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, United States
    For correspondence
    chun.han@cornell.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-7319-8095

Funding

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (R01NS099125)

  • Chun Han

NIH Office of Research Infrastructure Programs (R21OD023824)

  • Chun Han

Cornell University (Start-up fund)

  • Chun Han

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Hugo J Bellen, Baylor College of Medicine, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: November 5, 2019
  2. Accepted: May 18, 2020
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: May 19, 2020 (version 1)

Copyright

© 2020, Poe et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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