1. Evolutionary Biology
Download icon

Evolutionary stasis of the pseudoautosomal boundary in strepsirrhine primates

  1. Rylan Shearn
  2. Alison E Wright
  3. Sylvain Mousset
  4. Corinne Régis
  5. Simon Penel
  6. Jean-François Lemaitre
  7. Guillaume Douay
  8. Brigitte Crouau-Roy
  9. Emilie Lecompte
  10. Gabriel AB Marais  Is a corresponding author
  1. CNRS / Univ. Lyon 1, France
  2. University of Sheffield, United Kingdom
  3. University of Vienna, Austria
  4. Zoo de Lyon, France
  5. CNRS / Univ. Toulouse, France
Short Report
  • Cited 0
  • Views 307
  • Annotations
Cite this article as: eLife 2020;9:e63650 doi: 10.7554/eLife.63650

Abstract

Sex chromosomes are typically comprised of a non-recombining region and a recombining pseudoautosomal region. Accurately quantifying the relative size of these regions is critical for sex-chromosome biology both from a functional and evolutionary perspective. The evolution of the pseudoautosomal boundary (PAB) is well documented in haplorrhines (apes and monkeys) but not in strepsirrhines (lemurs and lorises). Here we studied the PAB of seven species representing the main strepsirrhine lineages by sequencing a male and a female genome in each species and using sex differences in coverage to identify the PAB. We found that during primate evolution, the PAB has remained unchanged in strepsirrhines whereas several recombination suppression events moved the PAB and shortened the pseudoautosomal region in haplorrhines. Strepsirrhines are well known to have much lower sexual dimorphism than haplorrhines. We suggest that mutations with antagonistic effects between males and females have driven recombination suppression and PAB evolution in haplorrhines.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Rylan Shearn

    LBBE, CNRS / Univ. Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Alison E Wright

    Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Sylvain Mousset

    Faculty of Mathematics, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Corinne Régis

    LBBE, CNRS / Univ. Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Simon Penel

    LBBE, CNRS / Univ. Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Jean-François Lemaitre

    LBBE, CNRS / Univ. Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Guillaume Douay

    Zoo de Lyon, Lyon, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  8. Brigitte Crouau-Roy

    Laboratoire Evolution et Diversité Biologique, CNRS / Univ. Toulouse, Toulouse, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  9. Emilie Lecompte

    Laboratoire Evolution et Diversité Biologique, CNRS / Univ. Toulouse, Toulouse, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-5711-7395
  10. Gabriel AB Marais

    LBBE, CNRS / Univ. Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, France
    For correspondence
    gabriel.marais@univ-lyon1.fr
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-2134-5967

Funding

Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR-­‐12-­‐ BSV7-­‐0002-­‐04)

  • Gabriel AB Marais

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Virginie Courtier-Orgogozo, Institut Jacques Monod - CNRS UMR7592 - Université Paris Diderot

Publication history

  1. Received: October 1, 2020
  2. Accepted: November 16, 2020
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: November 18, 2020 (version 1)
  4. Accepted Manuscript updated: November 19, 2020 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2020, Shearn et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

Metrics

  • 307
    Page views
  • 53
    Downloads
  • 0
    Citations

Article citation count generated by polling the highest count across the following sources: Crossref, PubMed Central, Scopus.

Download links

A two-part list of links to download the article, or parts of the article, in various formats.

Downloads (link to download the article as PDF)

Download citations (links to download the citations from this article in formats compatible with various reference manager tools)

Open citations (links to open the citations from this article in various online reference manager services)

Further reading

    1. Evolutionary Biology
    2. Genetics and Genomics
    Richard Benton et al.
    Short Report

    The insect chemosensory repertoires of Odorant Receptors (ORs) and Gustatory Receptors (GRs) together represent one of the largest families of ligand-gated ion channels. Previous analyses have identified homologous 'Gustatory Receptor-Like (GRL)' proteins across Animalia, but the evolutionary origin of this novel class of ion channels is unknown. We describe a survey of unicellular eukaryotic genomes for GRLs, identifying several candidates in fungi, protists and algae that contain many structural features characteristic of animal GRLs. The existence of these proteins in unicellular eukaryotes, together with ab initio protein structure predictions, provide evidence for homology between GRLs and a family of uncharacterized plant proteins containing the DUF3537 domain. Together, our analyses suggest an origin of this protein superfamily in the last common eukaryotic ancestor.

    1. Evolutionary Biology
    2. Genetics and Genomics
    Fan Han et al.
    Research Article

    Atlantic herring is widespread in North Atlantic and adjacent waters and is one of the most abundant vertebrates on earth. This species is well suited to explore genetic adaptation due to minute genetic differentiation at selectively neutral loci. Here we report hundreds of loci underlying ecological adaptation to different geographic areas and spawning conditions. Four of these represent megabase inversions confirmed by long read sequencing. The genetic architecture underlying ecological adaptation in herring deviates from expectation under a classical infinitesimal model for complex traits because of large shifts in allele frequencies at hundreds of loci under selection.