1. Neuroscience
Download icon

Blood Flow: Supplying the sleeping brain

  1. Stephanie D Williams
  2. Laura D Lewis  Is a corresponding author
  1. Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Boston University, United States
  2. Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, United States
Insight
Cite this article as: eLife 2020;9:e64597 doi: 10.7554/eLife.64597
1 figure

Figures

Large fluctuations in blood volume and altered neurovascular coupling occur during sleep in mice.

Changes in neurovascular dynamics were examined in head-fixed mice (left) which were awake (grey), in non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM; blue), and rapid eye movement sleep (REM; red). (A) As inferred from changes in cortical hemoglobin levels, total blood volume increases drastically during sleep, especially during REM sleep. (B) Average arteriole dilation during sleep increases above the level found during the awake state. (C) Sleep occurs during eyes-open behavioral rest in head-fixed mice. NREM sleep (38% of rest periods) commonly occurred during behavioral rest. REM sleep was less common but still occurred (5% of rest periods). (D) The strength of coupling between neural signals (multi-unit activity, or MUA) and levels of cortical hemoglobin (HbT) increased during NREM sleep, and the timing of coupling shifted across sleep stages.

Image credit: Mouse illustrations adapted from Luigi Petrucco via SciDraw (CCBY 4.0); Blood cells illustrations adapted from John Chilton via SciDraw (CCBY 4.0); Panel C adapted from Turner et al., 2020 (CCBY 4.0).

Download links

A two-part list of links to download the article, or parts of the article, in various formats.

Downloads (link to download the article as PDF)

Download citations (links to download the citations from this article in formats compatible with various reference manager tools)

Open citations (links to open the citations from this article in various online reference manager services)