Author response image 3. | A quantitative framework for whole-body coordination reveals specific deficits in freely walking ataxic mice

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A quantitative framework for whole-body coordination reveals specific deficits in freely walking ataxic mice

Author response image 3.

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Champalimaud Foundation, Portugal
Author response image 3.
Download figureOpen in new tabAuthor response image 3. Physical model.

The physical model of the tail consists of three masses 1, 2 and 3 (the later being the most distal) connected via an angualar spring-damper system. The masses of each segment were estimated from measurements of a real mouse tail (10g, 0.6g, 0.001g for segments 1, 2 and 3 respectively). The springs and dampers were estimated manually (k1=13e-6 Nm/deg, c1=0.95e-6 Nms/deg, k2=5e-6 Nm/deg, c2=0.7e-6 Nms/deg and k3=20e-6 Nm/deg, c3=0.2e-6 Nms/deg). The model was implemented and tested in SimMechanics MATLAB 2015a. (A) The phases of segments 1, 2 and 3 in the model (lines) superimposed over segments of 18 and 15 of the pcd tail. (B) Trajectories of tail segment 8 for controls (black), and pcd (purple), and tail segment 2 for the physical model.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07892.025