Browse our latest Ecology articles

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    1. Ecology

    Implications of being born late in the active season for growth, fattening, torpor use, winter survival and fecundity

    Britta Mahlert et al.
    Being born late in the active season is associated with a fast life history in a hibernating species, the garden dormouse (Eliomys quercinus).
    1. Ecology

    Hibernation: Life in the fast lane

    C Loren Buck
    Dormice born late in the year start to prepare for winter sooner than mice born earlier in the year.
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    1. Ecology

    Naked mole-rat mortality rates defy Gompertzian laws by not increasing with age

    J Graham Ruby et al.
    Unlike all other mammals studied to date, the age-specific risk of mortality for naked mole-rats did not increase over decades of life, identifying this species as a non-aging mammal.
    1. Ecology

    Life Expectancy: Age is just a number

    Hiram Beltrán-Sánchez, Caleb Finch
    The naked mole rat defies the Gompertz law and shows no sign of increased mortality risk as it gets older.
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    1. Computational and Systems Biology
    2. Ecology

    Tree crickets optimize the acoustics of baffles to exaggerate their mate-attraction signal

    Natasha Mhatre et al.
    Tree crickets can optimize the baffles they make to increase call loudness without any progressive optimization, and manufacture an optimal baffle in a single attempt, by using a simple yet highly accurate heuristic.
    1. Ecology

    No general relationship between mass and temperature in endothermic species

    Kristina Riemer et al.
    Data analysis of a large number of species indicates that a negative temperature-mass relationship is not common among species, which has been an ecological assumption for over a century.
    1. Ecology
    2. Plant Biology

    The diversity of floral temperature patterns, and their use by pollinators

    Michael JM Harrap et al.
    Flowers of different plant species show distinct and highly diverse patterns of temperature across their surfaces, and bumblebees are able to differentiate between these previously unnoticed but widespread floral cues.
    1. Ecology
    2. Plant Biology

    Pollination: Solar flower power

    Julia Bing, Danny Kessler
    Bumblebees use invisible temperature patterns on flowers to make foraging decisions.
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    1. Ecology

    Sequestration and activation of plant toxins protect the western corn rootworm from enemies at multiple trophic levels

    Christelle AM Robert et al.
    The western corn rootworm escapes biological control by entomopathogenic nematodes by partitioning and phenocopying the plant defense system for self-protection.
    1. Ecology

    Migration confers winter survival benefits in a partially migratory songbird

    Daniel Zúñiga et al.
    Testing of fitness-related benefits in migratory population of European blackbirds offers confirming predictions of theoretical models on the evolution and maintenance of migration.