1. Cancer Biology
  2. Cell Biology
Download icon

Cell Proliferation: The ROCKs on which tumour cells thrive

  1. Simon Wilkinson  Is a corresponding author
  2. Margaret C Frame
  1. University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Insight
Cite this article as: eLife 2016;5:e14511 doi: 10.7554/eLife.14511
1 figure

Figures

ROCK proteins and the cell cycle.

ROCK1 and ROCK2 help cells to divide by enabling a process called actomyosin contractility (left). This process also promotes the production of three proteins (CDK1, CyclinA and CKS1) that have an important role in causing cells to increase in number (proliferate). These proteins drive the cell cycle that underpins the proliferation of both normal and cancerous cells: DNA replication occurs in stage S of the cycle, with cell division taking place in stage G2/M. Kümper et al. found that the loss of both ROCK genes, or the use of drugs that inhibit ROCK activity, can permanently stop mouse cells from dividing (right). This phenomenon, which is known as cellular senescence, is probably caused by the loss of actomyosin contractility, which leads to lower levels of CDK1, CyclinA and CKS1.

Download links

A two-part list of links to download the article, or parts of the article, in various formats.

Downloads (link to download the article as PDF)

Download citations (links to download the citations from this article in formats compatible with various reference manager tools)

Open citations (links to open the citations from this article in various online reference manager services)