Talin-KANK1 interaction controls the recruitment of cortical microtubule stabilizing complexes to focal adhesions

  1. Benjamin P Bouchet
  2. Rosemarie E Gough
  3. York-Christoph Ammon
  4. Dieudonnée van de Willige
  5. Harm Post
  6. Guillaume Jacquemet
  7. AF Maarten Altelaar
  8. Albert JR Heck
  9. Ben T Goult  Is a corresponding author
  10. Anna Akhmanova  Is a corresponding author
  1. Utrecht University, Netherlands
  2. University of Kent, United Kingdom
  3. University of Turku, Finland
  4. University of Utrecht, Netherlands

Abstract

The cross-talk between dynamic microtubules and integrin-based adhesions to the extracellular matrix plays a crucial role in cell polarity and migration. Microtubules regulate the turnover of adhesion sites, and, in turn, focal adhesions promote cortical microtubule capture and stabilization in their vicinity, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here, we show that cortical microtubule stabilization sites containing CLASPs, KIF21A, LL5β and liprins are recruited to focal adhesions by the adaptor protein KANK1, which directly interacts with the major adhesion component, talin. Structural studies showed that the conserved KN domain in KANK1 binds to the talin rod domain R7. Perturbation of this interaction, including a single point mutation in talin, which disrupts KANK1 binding but not the talin function in adhesion, abrogates the association of microtubule-stabilizing complexes with focal adhesions. We propose that the talin-KANK1 interaction links the two macromolecular assemblies that control cortical attachment of actin fibers and microtubules.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Benjamin P Bouchet

    Department of Cell Biology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  2. Rosemarie E Gough

    School of Biosciences, University of Kent, Canterbury, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  3. York-Christoph Ammon

    Department of Cell Biology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  4. Dieudonnée van de Willige

    Department of Cell Biology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  5. Harm Post

    Biomolecular Mass Spectrometry and Proteomics, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  6. Guillaume Jacquemet

    Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  7. AF Maarten Altelaar

    Biomolecular Mass Spectrometry and Proteomics, University of Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  8. Albert JR Heck

    Biomolecular Mass Spectrometry and Proteomics, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-2405-4404
  9. Ben T Goult

    School of Biosciences, University of Kent, Canterbury, United Kingdom
    For correspondence
    B.T.Goult@kent.ac.uk
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-3438-2807
  10. Anna Akhmanova

    Department of Cell Biology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands
    For correspondence
    a.akhmanova@uu.nl
    Competing interests
    Anna Akhmanova, Reviewing editor, eLife.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-9048-8614

Reviewing Editor

  1. W James Nelson, Stanford University, United States

Version history

  1. Received: May 24, 2016
  2. Accepted: July 12, 2016
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: July 13, 2016 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: August 23, 2016 (version 2)
  5. Version of Record updated: September 27, 2016 (version 3)

Copyright

© 2016, Bouchet et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Benjamin P Bouchet
  2. Rosemarie E Gough
  3. York-Christoph Ammon
  4. Dieudonnée van de Willige
  5. Harm Post
  6. Guillaume Jacquemet
  7. AF Maarten Altelaar
  8. Albert JR Heck
  9. Ben T Goult
  10. Anna Akhmanova
(2016)
Talin-KANK1 interaction controls the recruitment of cortical microtubule stabilizing complexes to focal adhesions
eLife 5:e18124.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18124

Share this article

https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18124

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