1. Neuroscience
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Visual Cognition: In sight, in mind

  1. Mariam Aly  Is a corresponding author
  1. Columbia University, United States
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Cite as: eLife 2018;7:e35663 doi: 10.7554/eLife.35663
1 figure

Figures

How visual and conceptual similarity are represented in different regions of the brain.

Objects that are represented similarly in a given brain region are shown close together, with thick solid lines connecting them. Objects that are somewhat similar are shown at intermediate distance, with thin solid lines connecting them. Objects that are represented distinctly are shown further apart, with thin dashed lines between them. (A) A region of the brain called the lateral occipital cortex, shown in blue, represents objects that look alike – like a lemon and a tennis ball – in similar ways. (B) The temporal pole and parahippocampal cortex, shown in green, represent objects that are conceptually related – like a tennis ball and tennis racket – in similar ways. (C) The perirhinal cortex, shown in red, integrates these different kinds of information such that objects that are conceptually related or that look alike are represented in similar ways.

IMAGE CREDIT: Object images courtesy of Bainbridge and Oliva (2015).

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