1. Developmental Biology
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Reciprocal action of Casein Kinase Iε on core planar polarity proteins regulates clustering and asymmetric localisation

  1. Helen Strutt
  2. Jessica Gamage
  3. David Strutt  Is a corresponding author
  1. University of Sheffield, United Kingdom
Research Article
  • Cited 0
  • Views 217
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Cite this article as: eLife 2019;8:e45107 doi: 10.7554/eLife.45107

Abstract

The conserved core planar polarity pathway is essential for coordinating polarised cell behaviours and the formation of polarised structures such as cilia and hairs. Core planar polarity proteins localise asymmetrically to opposite cell ends and form intercellular complexes that link the polarity of neighbouring cells. This asymmetric segregation is regulated by phosphorylation through poorly understood mechanisms. We show that loss of phosphorylation of the core protein Strabismus in the Drosophila pupal wing increases its stability and promotes its clustering at intercellular junctions, and that Prickle negatively regulates Strabismus phosphorylation. Additionally, loss of phosphorylation of Dishevelled - which normally localises to opposite cell edges to Strabismus - reduces its stability at junctions. Moreover, both phosphorylation events are independently mediated by Casein Kinase Iε. We conclude that Casein Kinase Iε phosphorylation acts as a switch, promoting Strabismus mobility and Dishevelled immobility, thus enhancing sorting of these proteins to opposite cell edges.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Helen Strutt

    Department of Biomedical Science, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Jessica Gamage

    Department of Biomedical Science, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. David Strutt

    Department of Biomedical Science, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom
    For correspondence
    d.strutt@sheffield.ac.uk
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-8185-4515

Funding

The Wellcome Trust (100986/Z/13/Z)

  • Helen Strutt
  • David Strutt

Medical Research Council (G0900203-1/1)

  • Jessica Gamage

The Wellcome Trust (210630/Z/18/Z)

  • Helen Strutt
  • David Strutt

Medical Research Council (G1000405-1/1)

  • Jessica Gamage

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Jeremy Nathans, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: January 11, 2019
  2. Accepted: May 14, 2019
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: May 15, 2019 (version 1)

Copyright

© 2019, Strutt et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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