1. Computational and Systems Biology
  2. Epidemiology and Global Health
Download icon

Reducing RSV hospitalisation in a lower-income country by vaccinating mothers-to-be and their households

  1. Samuel PC Brand  Is a corresponding author
  2. Patrick Munywoki
  3. David Walumbe
  4. Matthew J Keeling
  5. David James Nokes
  1. University of Warwick, United Kingdom
  2. KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Centre, Kenya
Research Article
  • Cited 0
  • Views 356
  • Annotations
Cite this article as: eLife 2020;9:e47003 doi: 10.7554/eLife.47003

Abstract

Respiratory syncytial virus is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract infection among infants. RSV is a priority for vaccine development. In this study, we investigate the potential effectiveness of a two-vaccine strategy aimed at mothers-to-be, thereby boosting maternally acquired antibodies of infants, and their household cohabitants, further cocooning infants against infection. We use a dynamic RSV transmission model which captures transmission both within households and communities, adapted to the changing demographics and RSV seasonality of a low-income country. Model parameters were inferred from past RSV hospitalisations, and forecasts made over a 10-year horizon. We find that a 50% reduction in RSV hospitalisations is possible if the maternal vaccine effectiveness can achieve 75 days of additional protection for newborns combined with a 75% coverage of their birth household co-inhabitants (∼7.5% population coverage).

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Samuel PC Brand

    The Zeeman Institute (SBIDER), School of Life Sciences, University of Warwick, Coventry, United Kingdom
    For correspondence
    S.Brand@warwick.ac.uk
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-0645-5367
  2. Patrick Munywoki

    Virus Epidemiology and Control Group, KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Centre, Kilifi, Kenya
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-9419-7155
  3. David Walumbe

    Virus Epidemiology and Control Group, KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Centre, Kilifi, Kenya
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Matthew J Keeling

    The Zeeman Institute (SBIDER), School of Life Sciences, University of Warwick, Coventry, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. David James Nokes

    The Zeeman Institute (SBIDER), School of Life Sciences, University of Warwick, Coventry, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-5426-1984

Funding

The Wellcome Trust (102975)

  • David James Nokes

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Anna Akhmanova, Utrecht University, Netherlands

Publication history

  1. Received: March 19, 2019
  2. Accepted: March 26, 2020
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: March 27, 2020 (version 1)

Copyright

© 2020, Brand et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

Metrics

  • 356
    Page views
  • 46
    Downloads
  • 0
    Citations

Article citation count generated by polling the highest count across the following sources: Crossref, PubMed Central, Scopus.

Download links

A two-part list of links to download the article, or parts of the article, in various formats.

Downloads (link to download the article as PDF)

Download citations (links to download the citations from this article in formats compatible with various reference manager tools)

Open citations (links to open the citations from this article in various online reference manager services)

Further reading

    1. Computational and Systems Biology
    2. Immunology and Inflammation
    Bisrat J Debebe et al.
    Research Article Updated
    1. Computational and Systems Biology
    2. Physics of Living Systems
    Felix Eduard Nolet et al.
    Research Article