1. Cell Biology
  2. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics
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3D in situ imaging of female reproductive tract reveals molecular signatures of fertilizing spermatozoa in mice

  1. Lukas Ded
  2. Jae Yeon Hwang
  3. Kiyoshi Miki
  4. Huanan F Shi
  5. Jean-Ju Chung  Is a corresponding author
  1. Yale School of Medicine, United States
  2. Boston Children's Hospital, United States
Research Article
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Cite this article as: eLife 2020;9:e62043 doi: 10.7554/eLife.62043

Abstract

Out of millions of ejaculated sperm, only a few reach the fertilization site in mammals. Flagellar Ca2+ signaling nanodomains, organized by multi-subunit CatSper calcium channel complexes, are pivotal for sperm migration in the female tract, implicating CatSper-dependent mechanisms in sperm selection. Here, using biochemical and pharmacological studies, we demonstrate that CatSper1 is an O-linked glycosylated protein, undergoing capacitation-induced processing dependent on Ca2+ and phosphorylation cascades. CatSper1 processing correlates with protein tyrosine phosphorylation (pY) development in sperm cells capacitated in vitro and in vivo. Using 3D in situ molecular imaging and ANN-based automatic detection of sperm distributed along the cleared female tract, we demonstrate that all spermatozoa past the UTJ possess intact CatSper1 signals. Together, we reveal that fertilizing mouse spermatozoa in situ are characterized by intact CatSper channel, lack of pY, and reacted acrosomes. These findings provide molecular insight into sperm selection for successful fertilization in the female reproductive tract.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Lukas Ded

    Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Jae Yeon Hwang

    Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Kiyoshi Miki

    Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Huanan F Shi

    Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-3710-5917
  5. Jean-Ju Chung

    Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, United States
    For correspondence
    jean-ju.chung@yale.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-8018-1355

Funding

National Institutes of Health (R01HD096745)

  • Jean-Ju Chung

Yale School of Medicine (Start-up funds)

  • Jean-Ju Chung

Yale University (a Yale Goodman-Gilman ScholarAward-2015)

  • Jean-Ju Chung

Male Contraceptive Initiative (Postdoctoral fellowship)

  • Jae Yeon Hwang

Czech Science Foundation (GJ20-17403Y)

  • Lukas Ded

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: Animal experimentation: This study was performed in strict accordance with the recommendations in the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals of the National Institutes of Health. All the mice were treated in accordance with guidelines approved by Yale (20079) Animal Care and Use Committees (IACUC).

Reviewing Editor

  1. Merritt Maduke, Stanford University School of Medicine, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: August 12, 2020
  2. Accepted: October 19, 2020
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: October 20, 2020 (version 1)
  4. Accepted Manuscript updated: October 22, 2020 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2020, Ded et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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