1. Ecology
  2. Plant Biology
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Genetic variation, environment and demography intersect to shape Arabidopsis defense metabolite variation across Europe

  1. Ella Katz  Is a corresponding author
  2. Jia-Jie Li
  3. Benjamin Jaegle
  4. Haim Ashkenazy
  5. R Shawn Abrahams
  6. Clement Bagaza
  7. Samuel Holden
  8. J Chris Pires
  9. Ruthie Angelovici
  10. Daniel J Kliebenstein
  1. University of California, Davis, United States
  2. Gregor Mendel Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Austria
  3. Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Germany
  4. University of Missouri, United States
Research Article
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Cite this article as: eLife 2021;10:e67784 doi: 10.7554/eLife.67784

Abstract

Plants produce diverse metabolites to cope with the challenges presented by complex and ever-changing environments. These challenges drive the diversification of specialized metabolites within and between plant species. However, we are just beginning to understand how frequently new alleles arise controlling specialized metabolite diversity and how the geographic distribution of these alleles may be structured by ecological and demographic pressures. Here we measure the variation in specialized metabolites across a population of 797 natural Arabidopsis thaliana accessions. We show a combination of geography, environmental parameters, demography, and different genetic processes all combine to influence the specific chemotypes and their distribution. This showed that causal loci in specialized metabolism contain frequent independently generated alleles with patterns suggesting potential within species convergence. This provides a new perspective about the complexity of the selective forces and mechanisms that shape the generation and distribution of allelic variation that may influence local adaptation.

Data availability

All data generated or analyzed during this study are included in the manuscript and supporting files.

The following previously published data sets were used

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Ella Katz

    Plant Sciences, University of California, Davis, Davis, United States
    For correspondence
    elkatz@ucdavis.edu
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-1619-5597
  2. Jia-Jie Li

    Plant Sciences, University of California, Davis, Davis, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  3. Benjamin Jaegle

    Vienna Biocenter (VBC), Gregor Mendel Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna, Austria
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  4. Haim Ashkenazy

    Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Tübingen, Germany
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-5079-4684
  5. R Shawn Abrahams

    Division of Biological Sciences, Bond Life Sciences Center, University of Missouri, Columbia, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-1749-2040
  6. Clement Bagaza

    Division of Biological Sciences, Interdisciplinary Plant Group, Christopher S. Bond Life Sciences Center, University of Missouri, Columbia, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  7. Samuel Holden

    Division of Biological Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  8. J Chris Pires

    Division of Biological Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  9. Ruthie Angelovici

    Division of Biological Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  10. Daniel J Kliebenstein

    Department of Plant Sciences, University of California, Davis, Davis, United States
    Competing interests
    Daniel J Kliebenstein, Reviewing editor, eLife.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-5759-3175

Funding

National Science Foundation (MCB 1906486)

  • Daniel J Kliebenstein

United States - Israel Binational Agricultural Research and Development Fund (FI-560-2017)

  • Ella Katz
  • Daniel J Kliebenstein

National Science Foundation (IOS 1655810)

  • Daniel J Kliebenstein

National Science Foundation (IOS 1754201)

  • Ruthie Angelovici

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Meredith C Schuman, University of Zurich, Switzerland

Publication history

  1. Received: February 23, 2021
  2. Accepted: May 2, 2021
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: May 5, 2021 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: June 15, 2021 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2021, Katz et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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