Browse our latest Microbiology and Infectious Disease articles

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    1. Genetics and Genomics
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Ancient Viruses: How infectious diseases arrived in the colonial Americas

    Ville N Pimenoff, Charlotte J Houldcroft
    Analysis of viral DNA from human remains suggests that the transatlantic slave trade may have introduced new pathogens that contributed to the devastating disease outbreaks in colonial Mexico.
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    1. Genetics and Genomics
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Ancient viral genomes reveal introduction of human pathogenic viruses into Mexico during the transatlantic slave trade

    Axel A Guzmán-Solís et al.
    The characterization of ancient B19V and HBV genotype A4 viruses circulating during Colonial epidemics provides new insights into the pathogens that were introduced to the Americas after the European colonization.
    1. Microbiology and Infectious Disease
    2. Physics of Living Systems

    Gut bacterial aggregates as living gels

    Brandon H Schlomann, Raghuveer Parthasarathy
    1. Evolutionary Biology
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    The roles of history, chance, and natural selection in the evolution of antibiotic resistance

    Alfonso Santos-Lopez et al.
    Selection imposed by antibiotics may dominate evolutionary forces acting on opportunistic pathogens like Acinetobacter baumannii, yet chance effects and a prior history in biofilm may constrain resistance and impose collateral sensitivities.
    1. Genetics and Genomics
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Uniparental nuclear inheritance following bisexual mating in fungi

    Vikas Yadav et al.
    Discovery of a novel mode of sexual reproduction, termed pseudosexual reproduction, in fungi where both parents are required for mating but only one contributes to the meiotic progeny, similar to hybridogenesis in animals.
    1. Ecology
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Niche partitioning facilitates coexistence of closely related honey bee gut bacteria

    Silvia Brochet et al.
    Experiments in gnotobiotic bees and culture tubes can recapitulate gut microbiota coexistence patterns observed in nature.
    1. Ecology
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Microbiome: What can we learn from honey bees?

    Julia A Schwartzman
    The Western honey bee provides a model system for studying how closely related species of bacteria are able to coexist in a single community.
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