Browse our latest Physics of Living Systems articles

Page 2 of 9
    1. Physics of Living Systems

    Negative reciprocity, not ordered assembly, underlies the interaction of Sox2 and Oct4 on DNA

    John W Biddle et al.
    Rigorous reanalysis of single-molecule data yields evidence for energy expenditure in the interaction of transcription factors on DNA.
    1. Physics of Living Systems
    2. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics

    Spatial and temporal organization of RecA in the Escherichia coli DNA-damage response

    Harshad Ghodke et al.
    Phase separated DNA-free stored forms of RecA dissolve in response to DNA damage to make RecA available for repair and recombination reactions as part of the bacterial (Escherichia coli) SOS response.
    1. Physics of Living Systems

    A first order phase transition mechanism underlies protein aggregation in mammalian cells

    Arjun Narayanan et al.
    Quantitative single molecule and super resolution imaging in mammalian cells reveal a population of precursor aggregates describable by first order phase transition theory.
    1. Physics of Living Systems

    High-molecular-weight polymers from dietary fiber drive aggregation of particulates in the murine small intestine

    Asher Preska Steinberg et al.
    Polymers from dietary fiber can control the aggregation of particulates in the murine small intestine in a manner qualitatively consistent with depletion interactions.
    1. Developmental Biology
    2. Physics of Living Systems

    Rapid changes in tissue mechanics regulate cell behaviour in the developing embryonic brain

    Amelia J Thompson et al.
    During embryonic development, tissue stiffness, which provides an important signal to motile cells, changes locally within tens of minutes in a well-controlled manner.
    1. Microbiology and Infectious Disease
    2. Physics of Living Systems

    Protein gradients on the nucleoid position the carbon-fixing organelles of cyanobacteria

    Joshua S MacCready et al.
    Carboxysomes, the carbon-fixation machinery of cyanobacteria, are equidistantly-positioned by dynamic gradients of the protein McdA on the nucleoid that emerge through interaction with a previously unidentified carboxysome factor, McdB.
    1. Microbiology and Infectious Disease
    2. Physics of Living Systems

    Carboxysomes: How bacteria arrange their organelles

    Emilia Mauriello
    The structures responsible for photosynthesis in bacteria use the nucleoid and two unique proteins as a scaffold to position themselves.
    Insight
    Available as:
    • HTML
    • PDF
    1. Physics of Living Systems

    Spatial control of neuronal metabolism through glucose-mediated mitochondrial transport regulation

    Anamika Agrawal et al.
    A quantitative analysis of glucose-dependent transport regulation indicates that mitochondrial accumulation in regions of high nutrient availability can enhance metabolism in neuronal axons under physiologically relevant conditions.
    1. Physics of Living Systems

    Body size-dependent energy storage causes Kleiber’s law scaling of the metabolic rate in planarians

    Albert Thommen et al.
    A combination of experimental and theoretical analysis identifies body size-dependent energy storage as the physiological cause of 3/4-power law scaling of the metabolic rate in planarians.
    1. Chromosomes and Gene Expression
    2. Physics of Living Systems

    DNA sequence encodes the position of DNA supercoils

    Sung Hyun Kim et al.
    Single-molecule experiments reveal that plectonemic supercoils occupy specific positions on DNA and a physical model relates this to the intrinsic curvature, providing an insight into how supercoiling organizes the genome.