Cryo-EM structures of the autoinhibited <em>E. coli</em> ATP synthase in three rotational states

  1. Meghna Sobti
  2. Callum Smits
  3. Andrew SW Wong
  4. Robert Ishmukhametov
  5. Daniela Stock
  6. Sara Sandin
  7. Alastair G Stewart  Is a corresponding author
  1. The Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute, Australia
  2. Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
  3. University of Oxford, United Kingdom

Abstract

A molecular model that provides a framework for interpreting the wealth of functional information obtained on the <em>E. coli</em> F-ATP synthase has been generated using cryo-electron microscopy. Three different states that relate to rotation of the enzyme were observed, with the central stalk's &epsilon; subunit in an extended autoinhibitory conformation in all three states. The Fo motor comprises of seven transmembrane helices and a decameric c-ring and invaginations on either side of the membrane indicate the entry and exit channels for protons. The proton translocating subunit contains near parallel helices inclined by ~30&ordm; to the membrane, a feature now synonymous with rotary ATPases. For the first time in this rotary ATPase subtype, the peripheral stalk is resolved over its entire length of the complex, revealing the F1 attachment points and a coiled-coil that bifurcates towards the membrane with its helices separating to embrace subunit a from two sides.

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The following data sets were generated

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Meghna Sobti

    Molecular, Structural and Computational Biology Division, The Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute, Darlinghurst, Australia
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Callum Smits

    Molecular, Structural and Computational Biology Division, The Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute, Darlinghurst, Australia
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Andrew SW Wong

    NTU Institute of Structural Biology, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Robert Ishmukhametov

    Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Daniela Stock

    Molecular, Structural and Computational Biology Division, The Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute, Darlinghurst, Australia
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Sara Sandin

    NTU Institute of Structural Biology, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Alastair G Stewart

    Molecular, Structural and Computational Biology Division, The Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute, Darlinghurst, Australia
    For correspondence
    a.stewart@victorchang.edu.au
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-2070-6030

Funding

National Health and Medical Research Council (1004620)

  • Daniela Stock

National Health and Medical Research Council (1109961)

  • Daniela Stock

National Health and Medical Research Council (1090408)

  • Alastair G Stewart

National Health and Medical Research Council (1022143)

  • Daniela Stock

National Health and Medical Research Council (1047004)

  • Daniela Stock

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Werner Kühlbrandt, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Germany

Version history

  1. Received: September 19, 2016
  2. Accepted: December 15, 2016
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: December 21, 2016 (version 1)
  4. Accepted Manuscript updated: December 22, 2016 (version 2)
  5. Version of Record published: January 5, 2017 (version 3)
  6. Version of Record updated: February 10, 2017 (version 4)

Copyright

© 2016, Sobti et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Meghna Sobti
  2. Callum Smits
  3. Andrew SW Wong
  4. Robert Ishmukhametov
  5. Daniela Stock
  6. Sara Sandin
  7. Alastair G Stewart
(2016)
Cryo-EM structures of the autoinhibited <em>E. coli</em> ATP synthase in three rotational states
eLife 5:e21598.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21598

Share this article

https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21598

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