1. Developmental Biology
  2. Neuroscience
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Age-dependent dormant resident progenitors are stimulated by injury to regenerate Purkinje neurons

  1. N Sumru Bayin
  2. Alexandre Wojcinski
  3. Aurelien Mourton
  4. Hiromitsu Saito
  5. Noboru Suzuki
  6. Alexandra L Joyner  Is a corresponding author
  1. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, United States
  2. Mie University, Japan
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Cite as: eLife 2018;7:e39879 doi: 10.7554/eLife.39879

Abstract

Outside of the neurogenic niches of the brain, postmitotic neurons have not been found to undergo efficient regeneration. We demonstrate that mouse Purkinje cells (PCs), which are born at midgestation and are crucial for development and function of cerebellar circuits, are rapidly and fully regenerated following their ablation at birth. New PCs are produced from immature FOXP2+ neural precursors (iPCs) that are able to enter the cell cycle and support normal cerebellum development. The number of iPCs and their regenerative capacity, however, diminish soon after birth and consequently PCs are poorly replenished when ablated at postnatal day five. Nevertheless, the PC-depleted cerebella reach a normal size by increasing cell size, but scaling of neuron types is disrupted and cerebellar function is impaired. Our findings provide a new paradigm in the field of neuron regeneration by identifying a population of immature neurons that buffers against perinatal brain injury in a stage-dependent process.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. N Sumru Bayin

    Developmental Biology Program, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Alexandre Wojcinski

    Developmental Biology Program, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Aurelien Mourton

    Developmental Biology Program, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Hiromitsu Saito

    Department of Animal Functional Genomics of Advanced Science Research Promotion Center, Mie University, Tsu, Japan
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Noboru Suzuki

    Department of Animal Functional Genomics of Advanced Science Research Promotion Center, Mie University, Tsu, Japan
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Alexandra L Joyner

    Developmental Biology Program, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, United States
    For correspondence
    joynera@mskcc.org
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon 0000-0001-7090-9605

Funding

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (R01NS092096)

  • Alexandra L Joyner

National Cancer Institute (P30 CA008748-48)

  • Alexandra L Joyner

National Institute of Mental Health (R37MH085726)

  • Alexandra L Joyner

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: All the experiments were performed according to protocols (#07-01-001) approved by the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center's Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) . Animals were given access to food and water ad libitum and were housed on a 12-hour light/dark cycle.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Mary E Hatten, Reviewing Editor, The Rockefeller University, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: July 6, 2018
  2. Accepted: July 30, 2018
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: August 9, 2018 (version 1)

Copyright

© 2018, Bayin et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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