1. Neuroscience
Download icon

Molecular and anatomical organization of the dorsal raphe nucleus

  1. Kee Wui Huang
  2. Nicole E Ochandarena
  3. Adrienne C Philson
  4. Minsuk Hyun
  5. Jaclyn E Birnbaum
  6. Marcelo Cicconet
  7. Bernardo L Sabatini  Is a corresponding author
  1. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Medical School, United States
  2. Harvard Medical School, United States
Research Article
  • Cited 0
  • Views 1,073
  • Annotations
Cite this article as: eLife 2019;8:e46464 doi: 10.7554/eLife.46464

Abstract

The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is an important source of neuromodulators and has been implicated in a wide variety of behavioral and neurological disorders. The DRN is subdivided into distinct anatomical subregions comprised of multiple cell types, and its complex cellular organization has impeded efforts to investigate the distinct circuit and behavioral functions of its subdomains. Here we used single-cell RNA sequencing, in situ hybridization, anatomical tracing, and spatial correlation analysis to map the transcriptional and spatial profiles of cells from the mouse DRN. Our analysis of 39,411 single-cell transcriptomes revealed at least 18 distinct neuron subtypes and 5 serotonergic neuron subtypes with distinct molecular and anatomical properties, including a serotonergic neuron subtype that preferentially innervates the basal ganglia. Our study lays out the molecular organization of distinct serotonergic and non-serotonergic subsystems, and will facilitate the design of strategies for further dissection the DRN and its diverse functions.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Kee Wui Huang

    Department of Neurobiology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Nicole E Ochandarena

    Department of Neurobiology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Adrienne C Philson

    Department of Neurobiology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Minsuk Hyun

    Department of Neurobiology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Jaclyn E Birnbaum

    Department of Neurobiology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Marcelo Cicconet

    Image and Data Analysis Core, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Bernardo L Sabatini

    Department of Neurobiology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States
    For correspondence
    bsabatini@hms.harvard.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-0095-9177

Funding

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NS103226)

  • Bernardo L Sabatini

Howard Hughes Medical Institute

  • Bernardo L Sabatini

National Institute of Mental Health (MH100568)

  • Bernardo L Sabatini

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: All procedures were performed in accordance with protocols approved by the Harvard Standing Committee on Animal Care following guidelines described in the U.S. National Institutes of Health Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals (HMS IACUC protocol #IS00000571). All surgery was performed under isoflurane anesthesia.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Julie A Kauer, Stanford University, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: February 28, 2019
  2. Accepted: August 13, 2019
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: August 14, 2019 (version 1)

Copyright

© 2019, Huang et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

Metrics

  • 1,073
    Page views
  • 300
    Downloads
  • 0
    Citations

Article citation count generated by polling the highest count across the following sources: Crossref, PubMed Central, Scopus.

Download links

A two-part list of links to download the article, or parts of the article, in various formats.

Downloads (link to download the article as PDF)

Download citations (links to download the citations from this article in formats compatible with various reference manager tools)

Open citations (links to open the citations from this article in various online reference manager services)