1. Neuroscience
Download icon

Classical conditioning drives learned reward prediction signals in climbing fibers across the lateral cerebellum

  1. William Heffley
  2. Court Hull  Is a corresponding author
  1. Duke University School of Medicine, United States
Research Article
  • Cited 0
  • Views 454
  • Annotations
Cite this article as: eLife 2019;8:e46764 doi: 10.7554/eLife.46764

Abstract

Classical models of cerebellar learning posit that climbing fibers operate according to a supervised learning rule to instruct changes in motor output by signaling the occurrence of movement errors. However, cerebellar output is also associated with non-motor behaviors, and recently with modulating reward association pathways in the VTA. To test how the cerebellum processes reward related signals in the same type of classical conditioning behavior typically studied to evaluate reward processing in the VTA and striatum, we have used calcium imaging to visualize instructional signals carried by climbing fibers across the lateral cerebellum in mice before and after learning. We find distinct climbing fiber responses in three lateral cerebellar regions that can each signal reward prediction. These instructional signals are well suited to guide cerebellar learning based on reward expectation and enable a cerebellar contribution to reward driven behaviors, suggesting a broad role for the lateral cerebellum in reward-based learning.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. William Heffley

    Department of Neurobiology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-7733-7398
  2. Court Hull

    Department of Neurobiology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, United States
    For correspondence
    hull@neuro.duke.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-0360-8367

Funding

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (5R01NS096289)

  • Court Hull

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (F31NS103425)

  • William Heffley

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: All experimental procedures using animals were carried out with the approval of the Duke University Animal Care and Use Committee (protocol #A010-19-01).

Reviewing Editor

  1. Jennifer L Raymond, Stanford School of Medicine, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: March 12, 2019
  2. Accepted: July 30, 2019
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: September 11, 2019 (version 1)

Copyright

© 2019, Heffley & Hull

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

Metrics

  • 454
    Page views
  • 76
    Downloads
  • 0
    Citations

Article citation count generated by polling the highest count across the following sources: Crossref, PubMed Central, Scopus.

Download links

A two-part list of links to download the article, or parts of the article, in various formats.

Downloads (link to download the article as PDF)

Download citations (links to download the citations from this article in formats compatible with various reference manager tools)

Open citations (links to open the citations from this article in various online reference manager services)

Further reading

    1. Neuroscience
    Oleksandr Yagensky et al.
    Research Article Updated
    1. Neuroscience
    Merse E Gáspár et al.
    Research Article