1. Neuroscience
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Spatial Navigation: A question of scale

  1. Muireann Irish  Is a corresponding author
  2. Siddharth Ramanan
  1. University of Sydney, Australia
  2. Macquarie University, Australia
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Cite this article as: eLife 2019;8:e50890 doi: 10.7554/eLife.50890
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Figures

How different spatial environments are represented in the human brain.

(A) In order to navigate successfully humans must be able to judge distances between objects on both small (e.g. rooms and buildings) and large (e.g. cities and countries) scales. (B) Peer et al. showed that estimating distance across different spatial scales engages three main clusters of brain regions that are organized along a gradient (represented by the white dashed lines in each hemisphere). Within each cluster, spatial environments that are smaller and more constrained (red and orange) are represented in posterior portions, whilst larger, less-constrained environments (blue and purple) are represented in more anterior portions of the clusters. The middle surface of the brain (where the right and left hemispheres meet) is shown in the upper panels; the outer surfaces of the two hemispheres are shown below.

Image credit: Adapted from Peer et al. (2019).

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