1. Medicine
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Performance of a deep learning based neural network in the selection of human blastocysts for implantation

  1. Charles L Bormann
  2. Manoj Kumar Kanakasabapathy
  3. Prudhvi Thirumalaraju
  4. Raghav Gupta
  5. Rohan Pooniwala
  6. Hemanth Kandula
  7. Eduardo Hariton
  8. Irene Souter
  9. Irene Dimitriadis
  10. Leslie B Ramirez
  11. Carol L Curchoe
  12. Jason E Swain
  13. Lynn M Boehnlein
  14. Hadi Shafiee  Is a corresponding author
  1. Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, United States
  2. Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, United States
  3. Extend Fertility, United States
  4. San Diego Fertility Center, United States
  5. Colorado Center for Reproductive Medicine IVF Laboratory Network, United States
  6. University of Wisconsin, United States
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Cite this article as: eLife 2020;9:e55301 doi: 10.7554/eLife.55301

Abstract

Deep learning in in-vitro fertilization is currently being evaluated in the development of assistive tools for the determination of transfer order and implantation potential using time-lapse data collected through expensive imaging hardware. Assistive tools and algorithms that can work with static images, however, can help in improving the access to care by enabling their use with images acquired from traditional microscopes that are available to virtually all fertility centers. Here, we evaluated the use of a deep convolutional neural network (CNN), trained using single timepoint images of embryos collected at 113 hours post-insemination, in embryo selection amongst 97 clinical patient cohorts (742 embryos) and observed an accuracy of 90% in choosing the highest quality embryo available. Furthermore, a CNN trained to assess an embryo’s implantation potential directly using a set of 97 euploid embryos capable of implantation outperformed 15 trained embryologists (75.26% vs. 67.35%, P<0.0001) from 5 different fertility centers.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Charles L Bormann

    Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States
    Competing interests
    Charles L Bormann, Charles L Bormann, Ph.D has a patent WO2019068073A1 pending..
  2. Manoj Kumar Kanakasabapathy

    Division of Engineering in Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, United States
    Competing interests
    Manoj Kumar Kanakasabapathy, ManojKumar Kanakasabapathy has a patent WO2019068073A1 pending..
  3. Prudhvi Thirumalaraju

    Division of Engineering in Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, United States
    Competing interests
    Prudhvi Thirumalaraju, Prudhvi Thirumalaraju has a patent WO2019068073A1 pending..
  4. Raghav Gupta

    Division of Engineering in Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  5. Rohan Pooniwala

    Division of Engineering in Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  6. Hemanth Kandula

    Division of Engineering in Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  7. Eduardo Hariton

    Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  8. Irene Souter

    Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  9. Irene Dimitriadis

    Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  10. Leslie B Ramirez

    Embryology, Extend Fertility, New York, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  11. Carol L Curchoe

    Embryology, San Diego Fertility Center, San Diego, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  12. Jason E Swain

    Colorado Center for Reproductive Medicine IVF Laboratory Network, Englewood, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  13. Lynn M Boehnlein

    Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  14. Hadi Shafiee

    Division of Engineering in Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, United States
    For correspondence
    HSHAFIEE@BWH.HARVARD.EDU
    Competing interests
    Hadi Shafiee, Dr. Shafiee has a patent WO2019068073A1 pending..
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-2240-7648

Funding

National Institutes of Health (R01AI138800)

  • Hadi Shafiee

Brigham and Women's Hospital (Precision Medicine Program)

  • Hadi Shafiee

Partners Healthcare (Innovation Discovery Grant)

  • Charles L Bormann

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Ethics

Human subjects: Embryo image/video data collected from patients were used in this study with an institutional review board approval (IRB#2017P001339) We used 3,469 recorded videos of embryos collected from patients with informed consent for research and publication, under an institutional review board approval for secondary research use.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Michael B Eisen, University of California, Berkeley, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: January 20, 2020
  2. Accepted: September 1, 2020
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: September 15, 2020 (version 1)

Copyright

© 2020, Bormann et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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