Video 1. | High performance communication by people with paralysis using an intracortical brain-computer interface

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High performance communication by people with paralysis using an intracortical brain-computer interface

Video 1.

Affiliation details

Stanford University, United States; Emory University and Georgia Institute of Technology, United States; Emory University, United States; Massachusetts General Hospital, United States; Brown University, United States; Rehabilitation R&D Service, Department of VA Medical Center, United States; Case Western Reserve University, United States; Louis Stokes VA Medical Center, United States; Harvard Medical School, United States
Video 1. Example of participant T6’s free-paced, free choice typing using the OPTI-II keyboard.

T6 was prompted with questions and asked to formulate an answer de novo. Once presented with a question, she was able to think about her answer, move the cursor and click on the play button to enable the keyboard (bottom right corner), and then type her response. In this example, the participant typed 255 characters in ~9 min, at just over 27 correct characters per minute. One of two audible ‘beeps’ followed a target selection, corresponding to the two possible selection methods: T6 could select targets using either the Hidden Markov Model-based ‘click’ selection (high-pitched noises) or by ‘dwelling’ in the target region for 1 s (low-pitched noises). The plot at the bottom of the video tracks the typing performance (correct characters per minute) with respect to time in the block. Performance was smoothed using a 30 s symmetric Hamming window. The scrolling yellow bar indicates the current time of that frame. During the free typing task, T6 was asked to suppress her hand movements as best as possible. (During the quantitative performance evaluations, T6 was free to make movements as she wished.) This video is from participant T6, Day 621, Block 17. Additional ‘free typing’ examples for T6 are detailed in Figure 1—figure supplements 1 and 2.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18554.007