1. Epidemiology and Global Health
  2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease
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Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Paratyphi A elaborate distinct systemic metabolite signatures during enteric fever

  1. Elin Näsström
  2. Tran Vu Thieu Nga
  3. Sabina Dongol
  4. Abhilasha Karkey
  5. Phat Voong Vinh
  6. Tuyen Ha Thanh
  7. Anders Johansson
  8. Amit Arjyal
  9. Guy Thwaites
  10. Christiane Dolecek
  11. Buddha Basnyat
  12. Stephen Baker  Is a corresponding author
  13. Henrik Antti
  1. Umeå University, Sweden
  2. The Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Vietnam
  3. Patan Academy of Health Sciences, Nepal
  4. The Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Nepal
Research Article
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Cite this article as: eLife 2014;3:e03100 doi: 10.7554/eLife.03100

Abstract

The host-pathogen interactions induced by Salmonella Typhi and Paratyphi A during enteric fever are poorly understood. This knowledge gap, and the human restricted nature of these bacteria, limit our understanding of the disease and impede the development of new diagnostic approaches. To investigate metabolite signals associated with enteric fever we performed mass spectrometry (GCxGC/TOFMS) on plasma from patients with Typhi and Paratyphi A infections and controls, identifying 695 individual metabolite peaks. Applying supervised pattern recognition, we found highly significant and reproducible metabolite profiles separating Typhi cases, Paratyphi A cases, and controls, calculating that a combination of six metabolites could define the etiological agent. For the first time we show that reproducible and serovar specific systemic biomarkers can be detected during enteric fever. Our work defines several biologically plausible metabolites that can be used to detect enteric fever, and unlocks the potential of this method in diagnosing other systemic bacterial infections.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Elin Näsström

    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Tran Vu Thieu Nga

    The Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Sabina Dongol

    Patan Academy of Health Sciences, Kathmandu, Nepal
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Abhilasha Karkey

    Patan Academy of Health Sciences, Kathmandu, Nepal
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Phat Voong Vinh

    The Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Tuyen Ha Thanh

    The Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Anders Johansson

    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  8. Amit Arjyal

    The Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Kathmandu, Nepal
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  9. Guy Thwaites

    The Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  10. Christiane Dolecek

    The Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  11. Buddha Basnyat

    Patan Academy of Health Sciences, Kathmandu, Nepal
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  12. Stephen Baker

    The Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
    For correspondence
    sbaker@oucru.org
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  13. Henrik Antti

    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Ethics

Human subjects: The institutional ethical review boards of Patan Hospital and The Nepal Health Research Council and the Oxford Tropical Research Ethics Committee in the United Kingdom approved this study. All adult participants provided written informed consent for the collection and storage of all samples and subsequent data analysis, written informed consent was given for all those under 18 years of age by a parent or guardian (Arjyal et al. 2011).

Reviewing Editor

  1. Quarraisha Abdool Karim, Center for the AIDS Program of Research in South Africa, University of KwaZulu Natal, South Africa

Publication history

  1. Received: April 15, 2014
  2. Accepted: May 26, 2014
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: June 5, 2014 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: July 1, 2014 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2014, Näsström et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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