1. Evolutionary Biology
  2. Plant Biology
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Natural selection and repeated patterns of molecular evolution following allopatric divergence

  1. Yibo Dong
  2. Shichao Chen
  3. Shifeng Cheng
  4. Wenbin Zhou
  5. Qing Ma
  6. Zhiduan Chen
  7. Cheng-Xin Fu
  8. Xin Liu  Is a corresponding author
  9. Yun-peng Zhao  Is a corresponding author
  10. Pamela S Soltis  Is a corresponding author
  11. Gane Ka-Shu Wong  Is a corresponding author
  12. Douglas E Soltis  Is a corresponding author
  13. Jenny Xiang  Is a corresponding author
  1. North Carolina State University, United States
  2. University of Florida, United States
  3. Beijing Genomics Institute, China
  4. Chinese Academy of Sciences, China
  5. Zhejiang University, China
Research Article
  • Cited 7
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Cite this article as: eLife 2019;8:e45199 doi: 10.7554/eLife.45199

Abstract

Although geographic isolation is a leading driver of speciation, the tempo and pattern of divergence at the genomic level remain unclear. We examine genome-wide divergence of putatively single-copy orthologous genes (POGs) in 20 allopatric species/variety pairs from diverse angiosperm clades, with 16 pairs reflecting the classic eastern Asia-eastern North America floristic disjunction. In each pair, >90% of POGs are under purifying selection, and <10% are under positive selection. A set of POGs are under strong positive selection, 14 of which are shared by 10-15 pairs, and one shared by all pairs; 15 POGs are annotated to biological processes responding to various stimuli. The relative abundance of POGs under different selective forces exhibits a repeated pattern among pairs despite an ~10-million-year difference in divergence time. Species divergence times are positively correlated with abundance of POGs under moderate purifying selection, but negatively correlated with abundance of POGs under strong purifying selection.

Data availability

Sequences of ortologous gene families and pairs of POGs sequences used for calculation of Ka and Ks have been submitted to Dryad (https://datadryad.org//). Raw transcriptome data have been submitted to NCBI SRA database with Bioproject number PRJNA508825 and Biosample number from SAMN10534244 to SAMN10534283 (Supplementary File 11).

The following data sets were generated

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Yibo Dong

    Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Shichao Chen

    Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, Gainesville, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Shifeng Cheng

    Beijing Genomics Institute, Shenzhen, China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Wenbin Zhou

    Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Qing Ma

    Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Zhiduan Chen

    State Key Laboratory of Systematic and Evolutionary Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Cheng-Xin Fu

    Laboratory of Systematic & Evolutionary Botany and Biodiversity, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  8. Xin Liu

    Beijing Genomics Institute, Shenzen, China
    For correspondence
    liuxin@genomics.cn
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  9. Yun-peng Zhao

    Laboratory of Systematic & Evolutionary Botany and Biodiversity, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China
    For correspondence
    ypzhao913@gmail.com
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  10. Pamela S Soltis

    Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, Gainesville, United States
    For correspondence
    psoltis@flmnh.ufl.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  11. Gane Ka-Shu Wong

    Beijing Genomics Institute, Shenzen, China
    For correspondence
    gane@ualberta.ca
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  12. Douglas E Soltis

    Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, Gainesville, United States
    For correspondence
    dsoltis@ufl.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  13. Jenny Xiang

    Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, United States
    For correspondence
    jenny_xiang@ncsu.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-9016-0678

Funding

National Science Foundation (DEB-442161)

  • Yibo Dong
  • Wenbin Zhou
  • Jenny Xiang

National Science Foundation (DEB-442280)

  • Shichao Chen
  • Pamela S Soltis
  • Douglas E Soltis

National Science Foundation of China (IOS-024629)

  • Shichao Chen
  • Yun-peng Zhao

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Daniel J Kliebenstein, University of California, Davis, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: January 15, 2019
  2. Accepted: August 1, 2019
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: August 2, 2019 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: September 13, 2019 (version 2)
  5. Version of Record updated: September 20, 2019 (version 3)
  6. Version of Record updated: January 17, 2020 (version 4)

Copyright

© 2019, Dong et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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