Wendy S Garrett
Curated by
Wendy S Garrett et al.

Mechanistic Microbiome Studies: A Special Issue

eLife is pleased to present a Special Issue to highlight recent advances in the mechanistic understanding of microbiome function.
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The microbiome encompasses the genetic material of all microorganisms within a specific environmental niche, ranging from animal guts to plant root systems. Its investigation has important implications for the study of disease and behaviour.

To highlight recent advances in the mechanistic understanding of microbiome function, eLife is pleased to present a Special Issue on this topic. This issue presents a collection of highly influential research relating to metagenomics, microbiota, and computational tools, as selected for publication by a specially convened group of experts.

Visit our main subject page to explore articles in the wider field of Microbiology and Infectious Disease and sign up to receive the latest research.

Collection

    1. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Human gut Bacteroides capture vitamin B12 via cell surface-exposed lipoproteins

    Aaron G Wexler et al.
    The human gut bacterial lipoprotein BtuG binds vitamin B12 with femtomolar affinity, can remove vitamin B12 from human intrinsic factor, and is required for commensal fitness in the gut.
    1. Ecology

    Experimental evaluation of the importance of colonization history in early-life gut microbiota assembly

    Inés Martínez et al.
    Experiments in ex-germ-free mice establish a measurable effect of colonization history on gut microbiota assembly, illuminating a potential cause for the high levels of unexplained individuality in host-associated microbial communities.
    1. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Resilience of small intestinal beneficial bacteria to the toxicity of soybean oil fatty acids

    Sara C Di Rienzi et al.
    Comparisons between lactobacilli bacteria in the small intestine and those evolved in the lab reveal several modes of resistance to toxic fatty acids.
    1. Computational and Systems Biology
    2. Immunology and Inflammation

    Computer-guided design of optimal microbial consortia for immune system modulation

    Richard R Stein et al.
    A computational method is presented that quantifies the effect that specific bacteria in the gut have on the immune system and guides the design of therapeutically potent microbial consortia to cure auto-immune disease.
    1. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Discovery and characterization of a prevalent human gut bacterial enzyme sufficient for the inactivation of a family of plant toxins

    Nitzan Koppel et al.
    A unique, widely distributed gut bacterial enzyme selectively metabolizes plant-derived cardiac glycoside drugs.
    1. Neuroscience
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Social interaction-induced activation of RNA splicing in the amygdala of microbiome-deficient mice

    Roman M Stilling et al.
    Social-interaction impairment in germ-free mice is associated with a markedly altered transcriptional response to social novelty in the amygdala, as characterised by replacement of upregulation of common stimulus-induced pathways with upregulation of the splicing machinery.
    1. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Antibiotic-induced changes in the microbiota disrupt redox dynamics in the gut

    Aspen T Reese et al.
    Disturbing the microbiota with antibiotics alters gut redox state via changes in electron acceptor availability, setting the stage for post-antibiotic succession.
    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    A selective gut bacterial bile salt hydrolase alters host metabolism

    Lina Yao et al.
    The deletion of a single gene encoding a selective bile salt hydrolase from the abundant human gut bacterium Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron significantly alters host metabolism.
    1. Immunology and Inflammation
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    Antibiotic-induced acceleration of type 1 diabetes alters maturation of innate intestinal immunity

    Xue-Song Zhang et al.
    Alteration of host gut microbiota by antibiotic exposure in early life remodeled host intestinal immune development and metabolism and enhanced the induction of type 1 diabetes in genetically predisposed animals.

Contributors

  1. Wendy S Garrett
    Wendy S Garrett
    Senior Editor
  2. Lora Hooper
    Lora Hooper
    Guest Editor
  3. Rob Knight
    Rob Knight
    Guest Editor
  4. Ruth Ley
    Guest Editor
  5. Peter Turnbaugh
    Peter Turnbaugh
    Guest Editor
  6. Rachel Dutton
    Guest Editor
  7. Xochitl Morgan
    Xochitl Morgan
    Guest Editor