Browse our latest research

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    1. Genetics and Genomics
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    The Photorhabdus asymbiotica virulence cassettes deliver protein effectors directly into target eukaryotic cells

    Isabella Vlisidou et al.
    The insect pathogenic bacterium Photorhabdus has evolved astonishing nano-scale analogues of hypodermic syringes that it uses to inject toxins into host cells.
    1. Microbiology and Infectious Disease
    2. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics

    A contractile injection system stimulates tubeworm metamorphosis by translocating a proteinaceous effector

    Charles F Ericson et al.
    Bacteria produce a syringe-like structure, loaded with a single protein within the lumen of its needle-like tube, that is sufficient for stimulating animal metamorphosis.
    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    2. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics

    Single molecule mechanics resolves the earliest events in force generation by cardiac myosin

    Michael S Woody et al.
    Cardiac myosin converts energy from ATP into mechanical work by transitioning from a short-lived force-bearing state, to a post working stroke state before the release of inorganic phosphate.
    1. Epidemiology and Global Health

    Enteropathogen antibody dynamics and force of infection among children in low-resource settings

    Benjamin F Arnold et al.
    Among children in low-resource settings, diverse enteropathogens share common, population-level antibody dynamics, which creates a new opportunity to estimate transmission through serologic surveillance.
    1. Neuroscience

    TMEM16B regulates anxiety-related behavior and GABAergic neuronal signaling in the central lateral amygdala

    Ke-Xin Li et al.
    SOM+ GABAergic neuronal signaling and inhibitory transmission in the central lateral amygdala is regulated by TMEM16B, which is also involved in fear and anxiety-like behaviors.
    1. Neuroscience

    Human motor fatigability as evoked by repetitive movements results from a gradual breakdown of surround inhibition

    Marc Bächinger et al.
    Motor fatigability is associated with a decrease in inhibition throughout the motor network, suggesting that selective inhibitory control is a key mechanism to maintain motor efficiency during repetitive movements.