Paleontology
Ian Baldwin
Curated by
Ian Baldwin et al.

Paleontology: A Collection of Articles

eLife has published papers on topics as diverse as paleoproteomics, ancient insects and the discovery of a new hominin species.
Collection

Collection

    1. Genomics and Evolutionary Biology

    The age of Homo naledi and associated sediments in the Rising Star Cave, South Africa

    Paul HGM Dirks et al.
    Independent dating techniques have established that the H. naledi fossils are between 236 and 335 thousand years old, indicating that small-brained hominins with relatively primitive body shapes co-existed with our early ancestors in Africa.
    1. Genomics and Evolutionary Biology

    New fossil remains of Homo naledi from the Lesedi Chamber, South Africa

    John Hawks et al.
    The discovery of new skeletal remains of Homo naledi in the Lesedi Chamber, South Africa, adds more evidence to our understanding of the morphology and behavior of this recently discovered species.
    1. Genomics and Evolutionary Biology

    Homo naledi and Pleistocene hominin evolution in subequatorial Africa

    Lee R Berger et al.
    A late Middle Pleistocene age for Homo naledi demonstrates a diversity of hominin species in Africa at this critical time in the archaeological record.
    1. Genomics and Evolutionary Biology

    Homo naledi, a new species of the genus Homo from the Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa

    Lee R Berger et al.
    A new hominin species has been unearthed in the Dinaledi Chamber of the Rising Star cave system in the largest assemblage of a single species of hominins yet discovered in Africa.
    1. Genomics and Evolutionary Biology

    Geological and taphonomic context for the new hominin species Homo naledi from the Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa

    Paul HGM Dirks et al.
    A new hominin species found in a South African cave is part of one of the most unusual hominin fossil assemblages on record.
    1. Genomics and Evolutionary Biology

    New footprints from Laetoli (Tanzania) provide evidence for marked body size variation in early hominins

    Fidelis T Masao et al
    Bipedal footprints made 3.66 million years ago provide the clearest available evidence to date of the occurrence of marked body size variation in Australopithecus afarensis..
    1. Biochemistry
    2. Genomics and Evolutionary Biology

    Protein sequences bound to mineral surfaces persist into deep time

    Beatrice Demarchi et al.
    A chemically unstable ostrich eggshell peptide survives for at least 3.8 million years at the equator, stabilized by strong mineral interactions.
    1. Ecology
    2. Genomics and Evolutionary Biology

    Heart fossilization is possible and informs the evolution of cardiac outflow tract in vertebrates

    Lara Maldanis et al.
    The discovery of a fossil heart in Rhacolepis buccalis demonstrates that it is possible to scrutinize the fossil record for important clues on cardiac structure and evolution.
    1. Ecology
    2. Genomics and Evolutionary Biology

    Brood care in a 100-million-year-old scale insect

    Bo Wang et al.
    The discovery of the earliest direct evidence of brood care in insects demonstrates a remarkably conserved egg-brooding reproductive strategy within scale insects in stasis for nearly 100 million years.
    1. Ecology
    2. Genomics and Evolutionary Biology

    Extreme adaptations for aquatic ectoparasitism in a Jurassic fly larva

    Jun Chen et al.
    Well-preserved fossils reveal an extreme morphological specialization of fly larvae, and broaden our understanding of the diversity of ectoparasitism in Mesozoic insects.
    1. Genomics and Evolutionary Biology

    Preservation of three-dimensional anatomy in phosphatized fossil arthropods enriches evolutionary inference

    Achim H Schwermann et al.
    X-ray imaging reveals well-preserved internal characters in mineralized arthropods from the Paleogene, urging the reexamination of previously neglected fossil collections.
    1. Biophysics and Structural Biology
    2. Genomics and Evolutionary Biology

    Methylation at the C-2 position of hopanoids increases rigidity in native bacterial membranes

    Chia-Hung Wu et al.
    Methylation specifically enhances the ability of hopanoids to rigidify membranes under physiologically relevant conditions, which impacts the current interpretation of the 2-methylhopane fossil record.