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Latest research

    1. Cell Biology
    2. Neuroscience

    TTBK2 and primary cilia are essential for the connectivity and survival of cerebellar Purkinje neurons

    Emily Bowie, Sarah C Goetz
    Signaling at the primary cilium is important to sustain the morphology, connectivity, and survival of a key neural population within the brain.
    1. Cell Biology

    Actin assembly ruptures the nuclear envelope by prying the lamina away from nuclear pores and nuclear membranes in starfish oocytes

    Natalia Wesolowska et al.
    Combined light and electron microscopy reveals a new function for Arp2/3-mediated actin assembly in nuclear envelope rupture, which leads to a separation of nuclear membranes and pores from the lamina.
    1. Ecology

    Genomic adaptations in information processing underpin trophic strategy in a whole-ecosystem nutrient enrichment experiment

    Jordan G Okie et al.
    Trait-based metagenomic analysis of an ecosystem fertilization experiment shows that genomic traits that affect the costs and rates of biochemical information-processing mediate community assembly.
    1. Neuroscience
    2. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics

    Quantitative analysis of 1300-nm three-photon calcium imaging in the mouse brain

    Tianyu Wang et al.
    Quantitative experiments and analysis determine the limit of excitation power of 1300-nm three-photon microscopy, and the imaging depth where three-photon outperforms two-photon for calcium imaging in the mouse brain.
    1. Neuroscience

    Social structure learning in human anterior insula

    Tatiana Lau et al.
    1. Computational and Systems Biology
    2. Evolutionary Biology

    Synteny-based analyses indicate that sequence divergence is not the main source of orphan genes

    Nikolaos Vakirlis et al.
    Homology information implicit in regions of conserved synteny allows quantification of gene origination by complete sequence divergence, revealing a larger-than-expected role for other mechanisms of origin, including de novo origination.
    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease

    A widely distributed metalloenzyme class enables gut microbial metabolism of host- and diet-derived catechols

    Vayu Maini Rekdal et al.
    A previously unrecognized group of metalloenzymes enables human gut microbes to metabolize dietary molecules and neurotransmitters and likely mediates interactions and metabolism among environmental microorganisms.